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Christ’s Eternal Sacrifice

10 The old system of living under the law presented us with only a faint shadow, a crude outline of the reality of the wonderful blessings to come. Even with its steady stream of sacrifices offered year after year, there still was nothing that could make our hearts perfect before God. 2–3 For if animal sacrifices could once and for all eliminate sin, they would have ceased to be offered and the worshipers would have clean consciences. Instead, once was not enough so by the repetitive sacrifices year after year, the worshipers were continually reminded of their sins, with their hearts still impure. For what power does the blood of bulls and goats[a] have to remove sin’s guilt?

So when Jesus the Messiah came into the world he said,

“Since your ultimate desire was not another animal sacrifice,
    you have clothed me with a body[b]
    that I might offer myself instead!
Multiple burnt offerings and sin-offerings
    cannot satisfy your justice.
So I said to you, ‘God—
    I will be the One to go and do your will,
    to fulfill all that is written of me in your Word!’ ”[c]

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Footnotes

  1. 10:4 The Aramaic can be translated “bulls and birds.”
  2. 10:5 As translated from the Aramaic. See also Ps. 40:6–8. The Hebrew of Ps. 40:6 has, “My ears you have pierced.” The Clementine Septuagint has “My ears you have prepared.”
  3. 10:7 Or “in the scroll of the Book.” The Aramaic can be translated “from the beginning of your writings [the Torah] it is spoken of me.”

Jesus Is Taken before Annas

12 Then the soldiers and their captain, along with the Jewish officers, seized Jesus and tied him up. 13 They took him first to Annas,[a] as he was the father-in-law of Caiaphas, the high priest that year.[b] 14 Caiaphas was the one who had persuaded the Jewish leaders that it would be better off to have one person die for the sake of the people.[c]

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Footnotes

  1. 18:13 John is the only Gospel account that inserts this pre-trial meeting with Annas. He was the retired and illegal high priest.
  2. 18:13 Or “close friend to the high priest.” The priesthood was corrupt in the time of Jesus. It was not proper for two men to hold the office of high priest at the same time, as it apparently was done in Jesus’ day. They both were called high priest in this narrative. See John 18:19, 24.
  3. 18:14 See John 11:49–51.

Jesus Interrogated by Annas

19 The high priest interrogated Jesus concerning his disciples[a] and his teachings.

20 Jesus answered Annas’ questions by saying, “I have said nothing in secret. At all times I have taught openly and publicly in a synagogue, in the temple courts, and wherever the people assemble. 21 Why would you ask me for evidence to condemn me? Ask those who have heard what I’ve taught. They can tell you.”

22 Just then one of the guards standing near Jesus punched him in the face with his fist[b] and said, “How dare you answer the high priest like that!”

23 Jesus replied, “If my words are evil, then prove it. But if I haven’t broken any laws, then why would you hit me?”

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Footnotes

  1. 18:19 It is interesting that Annas was concerned about Jesus’ disciples. The religious spirit is always concerned with impressive numbers and influence. Jesus only had twelve disciples who were always with him.
  2. 18:22 The Greek is simply “struck him.” This could have been with a rod, for the verb has an etymological connection to the word for “rod.” Most translators have chosen to use “struck [or ‘slapped’] with his hand.” Regardless, Jesus was beaten everywhere he went that night and the next morning until he was finally crucified.