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Isaiah 30:1-7 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 30

Oracle on the Futility of an Alliance with Egypt[a]

Ah! Rebellious children,
    oracle of the Lord,
Who carry out a plan that is not mine,
    who make an alliance[b] I did not inspire,
    thus adding sin upon sin;
They go down to Egypt,
    without asking my counsel,[c]
To seek strength in Pharaoh’s protection
    and take refuge in Egypt’s shadow.
Pharaoh’s protection shall become your shame,
    refuge in Egypt’s shadow your disgrace.
When his princes are at Zoan
    and his messengers reach Hanes,
All shall be ashamed
    of a people that gain them nothing,
Neither help nor benefit,
    but only shame and reproach.
    Oracle on the Beasts of the Negeb.
Through the distressed and troubled land[d]
    of the lioness and roaring lion,
    of the viper and flying saraph,
They carry their riches on the backs of donkeys
    and their treasures on the humps of camels
To a people good for nothing,
    to Egypt whose help is futile and vain.
Therefore I call her
    “Rahab[e] Sit-still.”

Footnotes:

  1. 30:1–17 Several independent oracles against making an alliance with Egypt have been strung together in this chapter: vv. 1–5, vv. 6–7, and vv. 8–17. That these were originally separate oracles is indicated by the fact that the oracle in vv. 6–7 is still introduced by its own heading: Oracle on the Beasts of the Negeb.
  2. 30:1 Make an alliance: lit., “pour out a libation,” namely, as part of the ritual of treaty making.
  3. 30:2 Without asking my counsel: it was a practice to consult God through the prophets or through the priestly oracle before making a major political decision (1 Sm 23:1–12; 1 Kgs 22:5), but Judah’s leadership, in its concern for security, was apparently trying to keep its plan for a treaty with Egypt secret even from the prophets, thus implicitly from God (29:15).
  4. 30:6 Distressed…land: the wilderness between Judah and Egypt, through which Judahite messengers had to pass, carrying their tribute to Egypt to buy assistance in the struggle against Assyria. Flying saraph: see notes on 6:2; 14:29.
  5. 30:7 Here as elsewhere (cf. Ps 87:4) Egypt is compared to Rahab, the raging, destructive sea monster (cf. Is 51:9; Jb 26:12; Ps 89:11); yet Egypt, when asked for aid by Judah, becomes silent and “sits still.”
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Isaiah 31:1-3 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 31

Against the Egyptian Alliance

Ah! Those who go down to Egypt for help,
    who rely on horses;
Who put their trust in chariots because of their number,
    and in horsemen because of their combined power,
But look not to the Holy One of Israel
    nor seek the Lord![a]
Yet he too is wise and will bring disaster;
    he will not turn from his threats.
He will rise up against the house of the wicked
    and against those who help evildoers.
The Egyptians are human beings, not God,
    their horses flesh, not spirit;
When the Lord stretches forth his hand,
    the helper shall stumble, the one helped shall fall,
    and both of them shall perish together.

Footnotes:

  1. 31:1 Seek the Lord: a technical expression for seeking a prophetic or priestly oracle, similar to the expression “asking my counsel” in 30:2. The prophet complains that Judah has decided on its policy of alliance with Egypt without first consulting the Lord.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Ezekiel 29:6-7 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Then all the inhabitants of Egypt
    will know that I am the Lord.
Because you were a staff of reeds[a]
    for the house of Israel:
When they took hold of you, you would splinter,
    throwing shoulders out of joint.
When they leaned on you, you would break,
    pitching them down headlong.

Footnotes:

  1. 29:6 Staff of reeds: Pharaoh is like a reed that looks sturdy but breaks under pressure. For a similar image, cf. 2 Kgs 18:21 (Is 36:6).
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

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