Chapter 91

Some of the ancients were of opinion that Moses was the penman, not only of the foregoing psalm, which is expressly said to be his, but also of the eight that next follow it; but that cannot be, for Ps. 95:1-11 is expressly said to be penned by David, and long after Moses, Heb. 4:7. It is probable that this psalm also was penned by David; it is a writ of protection for all true believers, not in the name of king David, or under his broad seal; he needed it himself, especially if the psalm was penned, as some conjecture it was, at the time of the pestilence which was sent for his numbering the people; but in the name of the King of kings, and under the broad seal of Heaven. Observe, I. The psalmist’s own resolution to take God for his keeper (Ps. 91:2), from which he gives both direction and encouragement to others, Ps. 91:9. II. The promises which are here made, in God’s name, to all those that do so in sincerity. 1. They shall be taken under the peculiar care of Heaven, Ps. 91:1, 4. 2. They shall be delivered from the malice of the powers of darkness (Ps. 91:3, 5, 6), and that by a distinguishing preservation, Ps. 91:7, 8. 3. They shall be the charge of the holy angels, Ps. 91:10-12. 4. They shall triumph over their enemies, Ps. 91:13. 5. They shall be the special favourites of God himself, Ps. 91:14-16. In singing this we must shelter ourselves under, and then solace ourselves in, the divine protection. Many think that to Christ, as Mediator, these promises do primarily belong (Isa. 49:2), not because to him the devil applied one of these promises (Matt. 4:6), but because to him they are very applicable, and, coming through him, they are more sweet and sure to all believers.