Chapter 15

Absalom’s name signifies the peace of his father, yet he proves his greatest trouble; so often are we disappointed in our expectations from the creature. The sword entailed upon David’s house had hitherto been among his children, but now it begins to be drawn against himself, with this aggravation, that he may thank himself for it, for, had he done justice upon the murderer, he would have prevented the traitor. The story of Absalom’s rebellion begins with this chapter, but we must go over three or four more before we see the end of it. In this chapter we have, I. The arts Absalom used to insinuate himself into the people’s affections, 2 Sam. 15:1-6. II. His open avowal of his pretensions to the crown at Hebron, whither he went under colour of a vow, and the strong party that appeared for him there, 2 Sam. 15:7-12. III. The notice brought of this to David, and his flight from Jerusalem thereupon, 2 Sam. 15:13-18. In his flight we are told, 1. What passed between him and Ittai, 2 Sam. 15:19-22. 2. The concern of the country for him, 2 Sam. 15:23. 3. His conference with Zadok, 2 Sam. 15:24-29. 4. His tears and prayers upon this occasion, 2 Sam. 15:30-31. 5. Matters concerted by him with Hushai, 2 Sam. 15:32-37. Now the word of God was fulfilled, that he would raise up evil against him out of his own house, 2 Sam. 12:11.