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Scripture Engagement/Lectio Divina Resources
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Lectio Divina Resources

Books

Please note that there are numerous books on lectio divina (see the Bible Gateway Store); these are suggestions of a place to start.

Discovering Lectio Divina: Bringing Scripture Into Ordinary Life by James Wilhoit & Evan Howard

An insightful book about Scripture engagement in general and about lectio divina specifically. As the authors state, the book is “first and foremost about intimacy with God.” Their sections on the nature of the Bible and on the work of the Holy Spirit as we come to God’s Word are accessible and engaging. The book is also strongly motivational, particularly the chapters on the four stages of lectio divina which are practical and rich.

Contemplative Bible Reading: Experiencing God Through Scripture by Richard Peace

Includes a brief history of lectio divina and explains its original purpose and method. The introduction of the book contains a helpful explanation of individual and communal lectio divina, even providing an example of a lectio divina study for a beginner. The rest of the book consists of individual Bible studies and lectio exercises. The book includes an opening discussion, notes, and brief assignments. It is a wonderful tool to use for individual and group lectio divina exercises.

Articles Online

“Lectio Divina” (click on brochure)

An online brochure that includes a clear and concise description of lectio divina for those who are entirely new to the process. Though short, the brochure is an effective description and outline for both Scholastic and Monastic lectio divina. 

“The Practice of Lectio Divina”

A walkthrough of lectio divina that provides a straightforward look at the traditional four steps of the divine reading process and adds two important steps that are often neglected. This article also explains why Christians should pursue lectio divina and offers detailed explanations of each stage in the process. An excellent resource for those who are just getting started with lectio divina or those who have had some experience with it in the past.

“Step-By-Step Through Lectio Divina”

The article, provided by a Catholic organization, demonstrates a concise but theologically accurate explanation of lectio divina. It focuses on preparing one’s heart to be filled with the Holy Spirit through the practice, provides solid advice for how to perform each step, and gives detailed explanations of each stage. The article may not be the best choice for those with less training in theology or familiarity with lectio divina; those seeking a deeper understanding of the values of this discipline will find it particularly helpful.

Contemporary Catholics on Traditional Devotions”

The article was published in “America Magazine” and is directed toward those who have little or no familiarity with lectio divina. A very practical discussion of what lectio divina is and why it is important, the article also affirms that this very traditional practice is still very applicable today and not as difficult as it might seem. Another solid resource for those just starting out with lectio divina.

“The Classical Monastic Practice of Lectio Divina

The article, by accomplished Catholic theologian and author Thomas Keating, delves into the two different kinds of lectio divina, Scholastic and Monastic. He provides detailed explanations of what lectio divina is and what it is not and includes a brief overview of how to perform the Scholastic (or stage-oriented) form of lectio divina; but most of the article is about the Monastic procedure which is much less structured, leaving more room for freedom. This resource is probably best suited for those who have had previous experience with lectio divina, as it goes more in depth about the practice and might be too academic for those without a theological background or experience with this practice.

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© Phil Collins, Ph.D., 2014. This material was created in partnership with the Taylor University Center for Scripture Engagement.