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A Cry of Distress[a]

To the Pure and Shining One

David’s poetic song of praise To the tune of “Lilies”

69 1–2 God, my God, come and save me!
    These floods of trouble have risen higher and higher.
    The water is up to my neck![b]
    I’m sinking into the mud with no place to stand,
    and I’m about to drown in this storm.
I’m weary, exhausted with weeping.
    My throat is dry, my voice is gone, my eyes are swollen with sorrow,
    and I’m waiting for you, God, to come through for me.
I can’t even count all those who hate me for no reason.
    Many influential men want me silenced,
    yet I’ve done nothing against them.
    Must I restore what I never took away?

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Footnotes

  1. 69 Psalm 69 is considered one of the most outstanding messianic psalms, with obvious prophetic references to the sufferings and cross of Jesus Christ.
  2. 69:1–2 Or “throat.”

20 I’m heartsick and heartbroken by it all.
    Their contempt has crushed my soul.
    I looked for sympathy and compassion
    but found only empty stares.
21 I was hungry and they gave me bitter food.
    I was thirsty and they offered me vinegar.[a]

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Footnotes

  1. 69:21 This was fulfilled with Jesus being offered vinegar on the cross. See Luke 23:36.

Jesus’ Death on the Cross

28 Jesus knew that his mission was accomplished, and to fulfill the Scripture,[a] Jesus said: “I am thirsty.”

29 A jar of sour wine was sitting nearby, so they soaked a sponge with it and put it on the stalk of hyssop[b] and raised it to his lips.

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Footnotes

  1. 19:28 See Pss. 22:15; 69:21. The Fountain of Living Water now thirsts for the souls of men and women to come to him. He thirsts for your friendship.
  2. 19:29 The hyssop branch points to the sacrificial death of Jesus. Hyssop is first mentioned in Ex. 12:22 in reference to the application of lamb’s blood upon the door posts of the homes of the Hebrews the night of Passover. Hyssop was also used for the cleansing of lepers and points to the cleansing of our souls that happened when Jesus was crucified for sinners (spiritual lepers). See Ps. 51:7; Heb. 9:19.

47 Some who were standing near the cross misunderstood and said, “He’s calling for Elijah.” 48 One bystander ran and got a sponge, soaked it with sour wine, then put it on a stick and held it up for Jesus to drink. 49 But the rest said, “Leave him alone! Let’s see if Elijah comes to rescue him.”[a]

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Footnotes

  1. 27:49 A few Greek manuscripts have an additional sentence: “A soldier took a lance and pierced him in the side and blood and water poured out.” It is not found in the Aramaic and many Greek texts of Matthew. If included, it would mean the soldier took Jesus’ life with his lance. However, Jesus said that no man could take his life from him. The evidence is compelling that it was not part of the original text, but was taken from John 19:34 and added here.