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Psalm 124 The Voice (VOICE)

Psalm 124

A song of David for those journeying to worship.

If the Eternal had not been with us—
    sing, Israel, sing—
If He had not been with us
    when the villains came for us,
When their anger flamed around us,
    they would have swallowed us up alive!
Their hatred was like a flood:
the waters were rising and would have engulfed us;
    the streams were rushing past and would have overcome us.
The furious waters would have broken over us.
    Battered and overwhelmed, we surely would have drowned!

Blessed be the Eternal
    who did not leave us
    to be torn by their fangs!
Our souls cry out: “We escaped with our lives like a bird
    from the fowler’s snare!
The snare was broken,
    and we escaped with our lives!”

Our help has come in the name of the Eternal,
    the Maker of heaven and earth!

The Voice (VOICE)

The Voice Bible Copyright © 2012 Thomas Nelson, Inc. The Voice™ translation © 2012 Ecclesia Bible Society All rights reserved.

Genesis 8:1-19 The Voice (VOICE)

But God remembered Noah and all of the wild and domesticated animals with him in the ark. When it was time, God sent the wind to blow over all of the earth, and the waters began to subside. The subterranean waters from the depths of the earth and the casements of the heavens were again closed. The drenching rains that once fell from above finally stopped. All of the waters gradually receded from the land. At last, after 150 days, the waters abated; and on the 17th day of the 7th month, the ark at last came to rest on the mountains of Ararat. The waters continued to recede until the 10th month. On the 1st day of the 10th month, the tops of the mountains began to appear.

After 40 more days, Noah opened a window he had built into the ark, and he sent one of the ravens out into the sky. The raven flew back and forth until all of the waters had dried up on the land. He then sent out a dove to see if the waters had subsided from the surface of the land. But the dove found no place to land safely, and it returned to the ark. The waters were still covering the surface of the whole earth. So Noah put out his hand and brought the dove back into the ark. 10 Noah waited another seven days, and then he sent the dove out again from the ark. 11 This time the dove came back to him in the evening, and there, in its beak, was a freshly plucked olive leaf. So Noah knew then that the waters had begun to retreat from the land. 12 For good measure, Noah waited another seven days. Once more, he sent out the dove. This time, it didn’t return.

13 On the 1st day of the 1st month in Noah’s 601st year, the waters had dried up from the land. Noah removed the covering of the ark, looked out, and saw that the land was nearly dry. 14 By the 27th day of the 2nd month, the earth was completely dry. 15 God came to Noah with a message.

Eternal One (to Noah): 16 It’s time. Leave the ark now, you and your wife, your sons, and your sons’ wives. 17 Release every animal with you on the ark—everything of flesh: birds, animals, and every creeping thing—so that they may be fruitful, multiply in great numbers, and fill the land and the sky again.

18 So Noah left the ark with his sons, his wife, and his sons’ wives. 19 And every animal, every small creeping thing, and every bird—everything that moves on the earth—left the ark with him as new families—a new generation.

The Voice (VOICE)

The Voice Bible Copyright © 2012 Thomas Nelson, Inc. The Voice™ translation © 2012 Ecclesia Bible Society All rights reserved.

Romans 6:1-11 The Voice (VOICE)

We arrive here, children of a common ancestor, Adam. As such, we have inherited his traits, physically and spiritually. Although our sin may be of a different sort than his, we sin no less than Adam. The proof of that is death. Adam opens the way for sin and death to pursue us and run rampant across the earth. But from the beginning, God has a plan to reverse the curse. At just the right moment in human history, Jesus arrives, a son of Adam and the Son of God. Through His faithful obedience to His Father, He challenges the twin powers of sin and death and defeats them. Sin no longer reigns unchecked. Death no longer has the last word.

How should we respond to all of this? Is it good to persist in a life of sin so that grace may multiply even more? Absolutely not! How can we die to a life where sin ruled over us and then invite sin back into our lives? Did someone forget to tell you that when we were initiated into Jesus the Anointed through baptism’s ceremonial washing,[a] we entered into His death? Therefore, we were buried with Him through this baptism into death so that just as God the Father, in all His glory, resurrected the Anointed One, we, too, might walk confidently out of the grave into a new life. To put it another way: if we have been united with Him to share in a death like His, don’t you understand that we will also share in His resurrection? We know this: whatever we used to be with our old sinful ways has been nailed to His cross. So our entire record of sin has been canceled, and we no longer have to bow down to sin’s power. A dead man, you see, cannot be bound by sin. But if we have died with the Anointed One, we believe that we shall also live together with Him. So we stand firm in the conviction that death holds no power over God’s Anointed, because He was resurrected from the dead never to face death again. 10 When He died, He died to whatever power sin had, once and for all, and now He lives completely to God. 11 So here is how to picture yourself now that you have been initiated into Jesus the Anointed: you are dead to sin’s power and influence, but you are alive to God’s rule.

Footnotes:

  1. 6:3 Literally, immersion, in a rite of initiation and purification
The Voice (VOICE)

The Voice Bible Copyright © 2012 Thomas Nelson, Inc. The Voice™ translation © 2012 Ecclesia Bible Society All rights reserved.

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