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Obadiah New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Edom’s Fall Decreed

The vision of Obadiah.
Thus says the Lord God concerning Edom:
We have heard a message from the Lord,
    and a herald has been sent among the nations:
    “Rise up, so we may go to war against it!”
Now I make you least among the nations;
    you are utterly contemptible.
The pride of your heart has deceived you—
    you who dwell in mountain crevices,
    in your lofty home,[a]
Who say in your heart,
    “Who will bring me down to earth?”
Though you soar like the eagle,
    and your nest is set among the stars,
From there I will bring you down—
    oracle of the Lord.
If thieves came to you, robbers by night
    —how you have been destroyed!—
    would they not steal merely till they had enough?
If grape pickers came to you,
    would they not leave some gleanings?[b]
[c]How Esau has been searched out,
    his treasures hunted down!
To the border they have driven you—
    all your allies;
Your partners have deceived you,
    they have overpowered you;
Those who eat your bread[d]
    will replace you with foreigners,
    who have no understanding.

Edom’s Betrayal of Judah

On that day—oracle of the Lord—will I not
    make the wise disappear from Edom,
    and understanding from Mount Esau?
Teman,[e] your warriors will be terror-stricken,
    so that everyone on Mount Esau will be cut down.
10 Because of violence to your brother[f] Jacob,
    disgrace will cover you,
    you will be done away with forever!
11 On the day you stood by,
    the day strangers carried off his possessions,
And foreigners entered his gates
    and cast lots for Jerusalem,
    you too were like one of them.[g]

12 [h]Do not gloat over the day of your brother,
    the day of his disaster;
Do not exult over the people of Judah
    on the day of their ruin;
Do not speak haughtily
    on the day of distress!
13 Do not enter the gate of my people
    on the day of their calamity;
Do not gloat—especially you—over his misfortune
    on the day of his calamity;
Do not lay hands upon his possessions
    on the day of his calamity!
14 Do not stand at the crossroads
    to cut down his survivors;
Do not hand over his fugitives
    on the day of distress!

Edom’s Fall and Judah’s Restoration

15 Near is the day of the Lord
    against all the nations!
As you have done, so will it be done to you,
    your conduct will come back upon your own head;
16 As you drank[i] upon my holy mountain,
    so will all the nations drink continually.
Yes, they will drink and swallow,
    and will become as though they had not been.
17 But on Mount Zion there will be some who escape;[j]
    the mountain will be holy,
And the house of Jacob will take possession
    of those who dispossessed them.
18 The house of Jacob will be a fire,
    the house of Joseph a flame,
    and the house of Esau stubble.
They will set it ablaze and devour it;
    none will survive of the house of Esau,
    for the Lord has spoken.

19 They will take possession of the Negeb,[k] Mount Esau, the Shephelah, and Philistia, possess the countryside of Ephraim, the countryside of Samaria, Benjamin, and Gilead. 20 The exiles of this Israelite army will possess the Canaanite land as far as Zarephath,[l] and the exiles of Jerusalem who are in Sepharad will possess the cities of the Negeb. 21 And deliverers[m] will ascend Mount Zion to rule Mount Esau, and the kingship shall be the Lord’s.

Footnotes:

  1. 3 Edom occupied the mountains southeast of Israel and the Dead Sea.
  2. 5 Something of value may escape the thief, and the grape picker always leaves something for the gleaners, but God’s devastation of Edom will be complete.
  3. 6 With the past tense in vv. 5–7, the prophet presents a future event as if it had already happened.
  4. 7 Those who eat your bread: alliances were often established by covenant meals (cf. Gn 31:44–46). When Edom is destroyed, foreigners will replace the Edomites, who were known for wisdom (cf. v. 8; Jer 49:7; Jb 2:11).
  5. 9 Teman: a synonym for Edom; perhaps the name of a region or a city, the part representing the whole. Mount Esau: whatever its geographic reference, the phrase is an effective representation of Edom’s arrogance.
  6. 10 Your brother: used with a double meaning referring to the common lineage of Israel and Edom, in which their ancestors were brothers, Jacob and Esau (Gn 25:19–26), and referring also to their political alliance, in which allies were called brothers (cf. Am 1:9, 11).
  7. 11 In 587 B.C., Edomites joined the invading Babylonian forces (v. 13) and captured escaping Judahites. The destruction of Jerusalem strengthened and expanded Edom’s hold on Judah’s southern territory.
  8. 12–14 The commands in vv. 12–14 are not to be understood as future prohibitions but as descriptions of crimes Edom in fact already committed on the day of Jerusalem’s fall described in v. 11.
  9. 16 As you drank: i.e., Judah has suffered the punishment of divine wrath in 587 B.C. The oracle promises a similar fate for the nations, especially Edom (v. 18). The metaphor “drinking the cup of God’s wrath” occurs often in the Bible; cf. Jb 21:20; Is 51:17–23; Jer 25:15–16; Rev 14:10.
  10. 17–19 The Israelites will be restored and will occupy the lands of those who oppressed them. The survivors of Judah will be rejoined by the returned exiles from northern Israel.
  11. 19 Negeb: the area south of Judah and west of Edom. Gilead: east of the Jordan River.
  12. 20 Zarephath: a town in Phoenicia, north of Tyre; cf. 1 Kgs 17:10. Sepharad: perhaps Sardis in western Asia Minor. The later rabbis thought it was Spain.
  13. 21 Deliverers: the victorious Israelites who will rule over their enemies, as the ancient judges did; cf. Jgs 3:9, 15, 31; 10:1.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Ben Sira 45:15-26 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

15 For Moses ordained him
    and anointed him with the holy oil,
In a lasting covenant with him and his family,
    as permanent as the heavens,
That he should serve God in the priesthood
    and bless the people in his name.
16 He chose him from all the living
    to sacrifice burnt offerings and choice portions,
To burn incense, sweet odor as a memorial,
    and to atone for the people of Israel.
17 He gave to him the laws,
    and authority to prescribe and to judge:
To teach precepts to the people,
    and judgments to the Israelites.
18 Strangers rose in anger against him,
    grew jealous of him in the desert—
The followers of Dathan and Abiram,
    and the band of Korah in their defiance.
19 When the Lord saw this he became angry,
    and destroyed them in his burning wrath.
He brought against them a marvel,
    and consumed them in flaming fire.
20 Then he increased the glory of Aaron
    and bestowed upon him his inheritance:
The sacred offerings he allotted to him,
    with the showbread[a] as his portion;
21 The oblations of the Lord are his food,
    a gift to him and his descendants.
22 But he holds no land among the people
    nor shares with them their heritage;
For the Lord himself is his portion and inheritance
    among the Israelites.

23 Phinehas too, the son of Eleazar,
    was the courageous third of his line
When, zealous for the God of all,
    he met the crisis of his people
And, at the prompting of his noble heart,
    atoned for the children of Israel.
24 Therefore, on him also God conferred the right,
    in a covenant of friendship, to provide for the sanctuary,
So that he and his descendants
    should possess the high priesthood forever.
25 For even his covenant with David,
    the son of Jesse of the tribe of Judah,
Was an individual heritage through one son alone;
    but the heritage of Aaron is for all his descendants.

So now bless[b] the Lord
    who has crowned you with glory!
26 May he grant you wisdom of heart
    to govern his people in justice,
Lest the benefits you confer should be forgotten,
    or your authority, throughout all time.

Footnotes:

  1. 45:20 Showbread: cf. note on Ex 25:29–30.
  2. 45:25–26 So now bless: Ben Sira addresses the whole line of high priests, especially Simon II; cf. 50:1.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Matthew 1:18-2:12 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

18 Now this is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about. When his mother Mary was betrothed to Joseph,[a] but before they lived together, she was found with child through the holy Spirit. 19 Joseph her husband, since he was a righteous man,[b] yet unwilling to expose her to shame, decided to divorce her quietly. 20 Such was his intention when, behold, the angel of the Lord[c] appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary your wife into your home. For it is through the holy Spirit that this child has been conceived in her. 21 She will bear a son and you are to name him Jesus,[d] because he will save his people from their sins.” 22 All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet:

23 [e]“Behold, the virgin shall be with child and bear a son,
    and they shall name him Emmanuel,”

which means “God is with us.” 24 When Joseph awoke, he did as the angel of the Lord had commanded him and took his wife into his home. 25 He had no relations with her until she bore a son,[f] and he named him Jesus.

Chapter 2

The Visit of the Magi.[g] When Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, in the days of King Herod,[h] behold, magi from the east arrived in Jerusalem, saying, “Where is the newborn king of the Jews? We saw his star[i] at its rising and have come to do him homage.” When King Herod heard this, he was greatly troubled, and all Jerusalem with him. Assembling all the chief priests and the scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born.[j] They said to him, “In Bethlehem of Judea, for thus it has been written through the prophet:

‘And you, Bethlehem, land of Judah,
    are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
since from you shall come a ruler,
    who is to shepherd my people Israel.’”

Then Herod called the magi secretly and ascertained from them the time of the star’s appearance. He sent them to Bethlehem and said, “Go and search diligently for the child. When you have found him, bring me word, that I too may go and do him homage.” After their audience with the king they set out. And behold, the star that they had seen at its rising preceded them, until it came and stopped over the place where the child was. 10 They were overjoyed at seeing the star, 11 [k]and on entering the house they saw the child with Mary his mother. They prostrated themselves and did him homage. Then they opened their treasures and offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. 12 And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they departed for their country by another way.

Footnotes:

  1. 1:18 Betrothed to Joseph: betrothal was the first part of the marriage, constituting a man and woman as husband and wife. Subsequent infidelity was considered adultery. The betrothal was followed some months later by the husband’s taking his wife into his home, at which time normal married life began.
  2. 1:19 A righteous man: as a devout observer of the Mosaic law, Joseph wished to break his union with someone whom he suspected of gross violation of the law. It is commonly said that the law required him to do so, but the texts usually given in support of that view, e.g., Dt 22:20–21 do not clearly pertain to Joseph’s situation. Unwilling to expose her to shame: the penalty for proved adultery was death by stoning; cf. Dt 22:21–23.
  3. 1:20 The angel of the Lord: in the Old Testament a common designation of God in communication with a human being. In a dream: see Mt 2:13, 19, 22. These dreams may be meant to recall the dreams of Joseph, son of Jacob the patriarch (Gn 37:5–11, 19). A closer parallel is the dream of Amram, father of Moses, related by Josephus (Antiquities 2:212, 215–16).
  4. 1:21 Jesus: in first-century Judaism the Hebrew name Joshua (Greek Iēsous) meaning “Yahweh helps” was interpreted as “Yahweh saves.”
  5. 1:23 God is with us: God’s promise of deliverance to Judah in Isaiah’s time is seen by Matthew as fulfilled in the birth of Jesus, in whom God is with his people. The name Emmanuel is alluded to at the end of the gospel where the risen Jesus assures his disciples of his continued presence, “…I am with you always, until the end of the age” (Mt 28:20).
  6. 1:25 Until she bore a son: the evangelist is concerned to emphasize that Joseph was not responsible for the conception of Jesus. The Greek word translated “until” does not imply normal marital conduct after Jesus’ birth, nor does it exclude it.
  7. 2:1–12 The future rejection of Jesus by Israel and his acceptance by the Gentiles are retrojected into this scene of the narrative.
  8. 2:1 In the days of King Herod: Herod reigned from 37 to 4 B.C. Magi: originally a designation of the Persian priestly caste, the word became used of those who were regarded as having more than human knowledge. Matthew’s magi are astrologers.
  9. 2:2 We saw his star: it was a common ancient belief that a new star appeared at the time of a ruler’s birth. Matthew also draws upon the Old Testament story of Balaam, who had prophesied that “A star shall advance from Jacob” (Nm 24:17), though there the star means not an astral phenomenon but the king himself.
  10. 2:4 Herod’s consultation with the chief priests and scribes has some similarity to a Jewish legend about the child Moses in which the “sacred scribes” warn Pharaoh about the imminent birth of one who will deliver Israel from Egypt and the king makes plans to destroy him.
  11. 2:11 Cf. Ps 72:10, 15; Is 60:6. These Old Testament texts led to the interpretation of the magi as kings.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

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