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Lamentations 3 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 3

The Voice of a Suffering Individual[a]

I am one who has known affliction
    under the rod of God’s anger,
One whom he has driven and forced to walk
    in darkness, not in light;
Against me alone he turns his hand—
    again and again all day long.

He has worn away my flesh and my skin,
    he has broken my bones;
He has besieged me all around
    with poverty and hardship;
He has left me to dwell in dark places
    like those long dead.

He has hemmed me in with no escape,
    weighed me down with chains;
Even when I cry for help,
    he stops my prayer;
He has hemmed in my ways with fitted stones,
    and made my paths crooked.

10 He has been a bear lying in wait for me,
    a lion in hiding!
11 He turned me aside and tore me apart,
    leaving me ravaged.
12 He bent his bow, and set me up
    as a target for his arrow.

13 He pierced my kidneys
    with shafts from his quiver.
14 I have become a laughingstock to all my people,
    their taunt all day long;
15 He has sated me with bitterness,
    filled me with wormwood.

16 He has made me eat gravel,
    trampled me into the dust;
17 My life is deprived of peace,
    I have forgotten what happiness is;
18 My enduring hope, I said,
    has perished before the Lord.

19 The thought of my wretched homelessness
    is wormwood and poison;
20 Remembering it over and over,
    my soul is downcast.
21 But this I will call to mind;[b]
    therefore I will hope:

22 The Lord’s acts of mercy are not exhausted,
    his compassion is not spent;
23 They are renewed each morning—
    great is your faithfulness!
24 The Lord is my portion, I tell myself,
    therefore I will hope in him.

25 The Lord is good to those who trust in him,
    to the one that seeks him;
26 It is good to hope in silence
    for the Lord’s deliverance.
27 It is good for a person, when young,
    to bear the yoke,

28 To sit alone and in silence,
    when its weight lies heavy,
29 To put one’s mouth in the dust—[c]
    there may yet be hope—
30 To offer one’s cheek to be struck,
    to be filled with disgrace.

31 For the Lord does not
    reject forever;
32 Though he brings grief, he takes pity,
    according to the abundance of his mercy;
33 He does not willingly afflict
    or bring grief to human beings.

34 That someone tramples underfoot
    all the prisoners in the land,
35 Or denies justice to anyone
    in the very sight of the Most High,
36 Or subverts a person’s lawsuit—
    does the Lord not see?

37 Who speaks so that it comes to pass,
    unless the Lord commands it?
38 Is it not at the word of the Most High
    that both good and bad take place?
39 What should the living complain about?
    about their sins!

40 [d]Let us search and examine our ways,
    and return to the Lord!
41 Let us lift up our hearts as well as our hands
    toward God in heaven!
42 We have rebelled and been obstinate;
    you have not forgiven us.

43 You wrapped yourself in wrath and pursued us,
    killing without pity;
44 You wrapped yourself in a cloud,
    which no prayer could pierce.
45 You have made us filth and rubbish
    among the peoples.

46 They have opened their mouths against us,
    all our enemies;
47 Panic and the pit have been our lot,
    desolation and destruction;
48 [e]My eyes stream with tears over the destruction
    of the daughter of my people.

49 My eyes will flow without ceasing,
    without rest,
50 Until the Lord from heaven
    looks down and sees.
51 I am tormented by the sight
    of all the daughters of my city.

52 Without cause, my enemies snared me
    as though I were a bird;
53 They tried to end my life in the pit,
    pelting me with stones.
54 The waters flowed over my head:
    and I said, “I am lost!”

55 I have called upon your name, O Lord,
    from the bottom of the pit;
56 You heard me call, “Do not let your ear be deaf
    to my cry for help.”
57 You drew near on the day I called you;
    you said, “Do not fear!”

58 You pleaded my case, Lord,
    you redeemed my life.
59 You see, Lord, how I am wronged;
    do me justice!
60 You see all their vindictiveness,
    all their plots against me.

61 You hear their reproach, Lord,
    all their plots against me,
62 The whispered murmurings of my adversaries,
    against me all day long;
63 Look! Whether they sit or stand,
    I am the butt of their taunt.

64 Give them what they deserve, Lord,
    according to their deeds;
65 Give them hardness of heart;
    your curse be upon them;
66 Pursue them in wrath and destroy them
    from under the Lord’s heaven!

Footnotes:

  1. 3:1–66 This chapter is focused less on the destruction of Jerusalem than are chaps. 1 and 2 and more on the suffering of an individual. The identity of the individual is never given, and one probably should not search for a specific identification of the speaker. The figure of the representative sufferer makes concrete the pain of the people in a way similar to the personification of Zion as a woman in chaps. 1 and 2. Indeed, in vv. 40–48 the individual voice gives way to a communal voice, returning in vv. 49–66 to the individual sufferer.
  2. 3:21–24 In the midst of a description of suffering, the speaker offers this brief but compelling statement of hope in God’s ultimate mercy. It is a hard-won and precarious hope, nearly submerged by the volume and intensity of the surrounding lament, but it is hope nonetheless.
  3. 3:29 To put one’s mouth in the dust: a sign of humiliation and submission; cf. v. 16; Ps 72:9.
  4. 3:40–66 The plural voice in this lament suggests that a communal lament begins here; it then continues in the singular voice in vv. 55–66.
  5. 3:48–51 These verses are more appropriate on the lips of the poet, who speaks of “my city” (v. 51). Daughters of my city: here as elsewhere “daughter” may refer to villages dependent on a larger city.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Ben Sira 24:18-31 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

19 Come to me, all who desire me,
    and be filled with my fruits.[a]
20 You will remember me as sweeter than honey,
    better to have than the honeycomb.
21 Those who eat of me will hunger still,[b]
    those who drink of me will thirst for more.
22 Whoever obeys me will not be put to shame,
    and those who serve me will never go astray.”

23 All this is the book of the covenant of the Most High God,
    the Law which Moses commanded us[c]
    as a heritage for the community of Jacob.[d]
25 It overflows, like the Pishon, with wisdom,
    and like the Tigris at the time of first fruits.
26 It runs over, like the Euphrates, with understanding,
    and like the Jordan at harvest time.
27 It floods like the Nile with instruction,
    like the Gihon[e] at vintage time.
28 The first human being never finished comprehending wisdom,
    nor will the last succeed in fathoming her.
29 For deeper than the sea are her thoughts,
    and her counsels, than the great abyss.

30 Now I, like a stream from a river,[f]
    and like water channeling into a garden—
31 I said, “I will water my plants,
    I will drench my flower beds.”
Then suddenly this stream of mine became a river,
    and this river of mine became a sea.

Footnotes:

  1. 24:19 Mt 11:28–30 contains a similar invitation.
  2. 24:21 The paradox of wisdom is that, far from being satiated, those who partake of her will always desire more.
  3. 24:23 Ben Sira now identifies Wisdom and the law of Moses; see also Bar 4:1.
  4. 24:23

    Other ancient texts read as v. 24:

    Do not grow weary of striving with the Lord’s help,

    but cling to him that he may reinforce you.

    The Lord Almighty alone is God,

    and apart from him there is no savior.

  5. 24:27 Gihon: understood by some to have been a name for the Nile; cf. Gn 2:13.
  6. 24:30–33 Ben Sira again speaks about himself. He had at first drawn a small portion of the water of wisdom for his own private benefit, but finding it so useful, he soon began to let others share in this boon by teaching them the lessons of wisdom. Like the words of the prophets, Ben Sira’s instruction is valuable for all generations (v. 33). The comparison to prophecy is bold and unique.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

John 13 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

III. The Book of Glory[a]

Chapter 13

The Washing of the Disciples’ Feet.[b] Before the feast of Passover,[c] Jesus knew that his hour had come to pass from this world to the Father. He loved his own in the world and he loved them to the end. The devil had already induced[d] Judas, son of Simon the Iscariot, to hand him over. So, during supper, fully aware that the Father had put everything into his power and that he had come from God and was returning to God, he rose from supper and took off his outer garments. He took a towel and tied it around his waist. [e]Then he poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet and dry them with the towel around his waist. He came to Simon Peter, who said to him, “Master, are you going to wash my feet?” Jesus answered and said to him, “What I am doing, you do not understand now, but you will understand later.” Peter said to him, “You will never wash my feet.” Jesus answered him, “Unless I wash you, you will have no inheritance with me.” Simon Peter said to him, “Master, then not only my feet, but my hands and head as well.” 10 Jesus said to him, “Whoever has bathed[f] has no need except to have his feet washed, for he is clean all over; so you are clean, but not all.” 11 For he knew who would betray him; for this reason, he said, “Not all of you are clean.”

12 So when he had washed their feet [and] put his garments back on and reclined at table again, he said to them, “Do you realize what I have done for you? 13 You call me ‘teacher’ and ‘master,’ and rightly so, for indeed I am. 14 If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet, you ought to wash one another’s feet. 15 I have given you a model to follow, so that as I have done for you, you should also do. 16 Amen, amen, I say to you, no slave is greater than his master nor any messenger[g] greater than the one who sent him. 17 If you understand this, blessed are you if you do it. 18 I am not speaking of all of you. I know those whom I have chosen. But so that the scripture might be fulfilled, ‘The one who ate my food has raised his heel against me.’ 19 From now on I am telling you before it happens, so that when it happens you may believe that I AM. 20 Amen, amen, I say to you, whoever receives the one I send receives me, and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me.”

Announcement of Judas’s Betrayal. 21 When he had said this, Jesus was deeply troubled and testified, “Amen, amen, I say to you, one of you will betray me.” 22 The disciples looked at one another, at a loss as to whom he meant. 23 One of his disciples, the one whom Jesus loved,[h] was reclining at Jesus’ side. 24 So Simon Peter nodded to him to find out whom he meant. 25 He leaned back against Jesus’ chest and said to him, “Master, who is it?” 26 Jesus answered, “It is the one to whom I hand the morsel[i] after I have dipped it.” So he dipped the morsel and [took it and] handed it to Judas, son of Simon the Iscariot. 27 After he took the morsel, Satan entered him. So Jesus said to him, “What you are going to do, do quickly.” 28 [Now] none of those reclining at table realized why he said this to him. 29 Some thought that since Judas kept the money bag, Jesus had told him, “Buy what we need for the feast,” or to give something to the poor. 30 So he took the morsel and left at once. And it was night.

The New Commandment. 31 [j]When he had left, Jesus said,[k] “Now is the Son of Man glorified, and God is glorified in him. 32 [If God is glorified in him,] God will also glorify him in himself, and he will glorify him at once. 33 My children, I will be with you only a little while longer. You will look for me, and as I told the Jews, ‘Where I go you cannot come,’ so now I say it to you. 34 I give you a new commandment:[l] love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another. 35 This is how all will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”

Peter’s Denial Predicted. 36 Simon Peter said to him, “Master, where are you going?” Jesus answered [him], “Where I am going, you cannot follow me now, though you will follow later.” 37 Peter said to him, “Master, why can’t I follow you now? I will lay down my life for you.” 38 Jesus answered, “Will you lay down your life for me? Amen, amen, I say to you, the cock will not crow before you deny me three times.”

Footnotes:

  1. 13:1–19:42 The Book of Glory. There is a major break here; the word “sign” is used again only in Jn 20:30. In this phase of Jesus’ return to the Father, the discourses (Jn 13–17) precede the traditional narrative of the passion (Jn 18–20) to interpret them for the Christian reader. This is the only extended example of esoteric teaching of disciples in John.
  2. 13:1–20 Washing of the disciples’ feet. This episode occurs in John at the place of the narration of the institution of the Eucharist in the synoptics. It may be a dramatization of Lk 22:27—“I am your servant.” It is presented as a “model” (“pattern”) of the crucifixion. It symbolizes cleansing from sin by sacrificial death.
  3. 13:1 Before the feast of Passover: this would be Thursday evening, before the day of preparation; in the synoptics, the Last Supper is a Passover meal taking place, in John’s chronology, on Friday evening. To the end: or, “completely.”
  4. 13:2 Induced: literally, “The devil put into the heart that Judas should hand him over.”
  5. 13:5 The act of washing another’s feet was one that could not be required of the lowliest Jewish slave. It is an allusion to the humiliating death of the crucifixion.
  6. 13:10 Bathed: many have suggested that this passage is a symbolic reference to baptism. The Greek root involved is used in baptismal contexts in 1 Cor 6:11; Eph 5:26; Ti 3:5; Hb 10:22.
  7. 13:16 Messenger: the Greek has apostolos, the only occurrence of the term in John. It is not used in the technical sense here.
  8. 13:23 The one whom Jesus loved: also mentioned in Jn 19:26; 20:2; 21:7. A disciple, called “another disciple” or “the other disciple,” is mentioned in Jn 18:15 and Jn 20:2; in the latter reference he is identified with the disciple whom Jesus loved. There is also an unnamed disciple in Jn 1:35–40; see note on Jn 1:37.
  9. 13:26 Morsel: probably the bitter herb dipped in salt water.
  10. 13:31–17:26 Two farewell discourses and a prayer. These seem to be Johannine compositions, including sayings of Jesus at the Last Supper and on other occasions, modeled on similar farewell discourses in Greek literature and the Old Testament (of Moses, Joshua, David).
  11. 13:31–38 Introduction: departure and return. Terms of coming and going predominate. These verses form an introduction to the last discourse of Jesus, which extends through Jn 14–17. In it John has collected Jesus’ words to his own (Jn 13:1). There are indications that several speeches have been fused together, e.g., in Jn 14:31 and Jn 17:1.
  12. 13:34 I give you a new commandment: this puts Jesus on a par with Yahweh. The commandment itself is not new; cf. Lv 19:18 and the note there.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

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