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Job 40-42 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 40

The Lord then answered Job and said:

Will one who argues with the Almighty be corrected?
    Let him who would instruct God give answer!

Then Job answered the Lord and said:

[a]Look, I am of little account; what can I answer you?
    I put my hand over my mouth.
I have spoken once, I will not reply;
    twice, but I will do so no more.

Then the Lord answered Job out of the storm and said:

Gird up your loins now, like a man.
    I will question you, and you tell me the answers!
[b]Would you refuse to acknowledge my right?
    Would you condemn me that you may be justified?
Have you an arm like that of God,
    or can you thunder with a voice like his?
10 Adorn yourself with grandeur and majesty,
    and clothe yourself with glory and splendor.
11 Let loose the fury of your wrath;
    look at everyone who is proud and bring them down.
12 Look at everyone who is proud, and humble them.
    Tear down the wicked in their place,
13     bury them in the dust together;
    in the hidden world imprison them.
14 Then will I too praise you,
    for your own right hand can save you.
15 Look at Behemoth,[c] whom I made along with you,
    who feeds on grass like an ox.
16 See the strength in his loins,
    the power in the sinews of his belly.
17 He carries his tail like a cedar;
    the sinews of his thighs are like cables.
18 His bones are like tubes of bronze;
    his limbs are like iron rods.
19 He is the first of God’s ways,
    only his maker can approach him with a sword.
20 For the mountains bring him produce,
    and all wild animals make sport there.
21 Under lotus trees he lies,
    in coverts of the reedy swamp.
22 The lotus trees cover him with their shade;
    all about him are the poplars in the wadi.
23 If the river grows violent, he is not disturbed;
    he is tranquil though the Jordan surges about his mouth.
24 Who can capture him by his eyes,
    or pierce his nose[d] with a trap?
25 Can you lead Leviathan[e] about with a hook,
    or tie down his tongue with a rope?
26 Can you put a ring into his nose,
    or pierce through his cheek with a gaff?
27 Will he then plead with you, time after time,
    or address you with tender words?
28 Will he make a covenant with you
    that you may have him as a slave forever?
29 Can you play with him, as with a bird?
    Can you tie him up for your little girls?
30 Will the traders bargain for him?
    Will the merchants[f] divide him up?
31 Can you fill his hide with barbs,
    or his head with fish spears?
32 Once you but lay a hand upon him,
    no need to recall any other conflict!

Chapter 41

Whoever might vainly hope to do so
    need only see him to be overthrown.
No one is fierce enough to arouse him;
    who then dares stand before me?
Whoever has assailed me, I will pay back—
    Everything under the heavens is mine.
I need hardly mention his limbs,
    his strength, and the fitness of his equipment.
Who can strip off his outer garment,
    or penetrate his double armor?
Who can force open the doors of his face,
    close to his terrible teeth?
Rows of scales are on his back,
    tightly sealed together;
They are fitted so close to each other
    that no air can come between them;
So joined to one another
    that they hold fast and cannot be parted.
10 When he sneezes, light flashes forth;
    his eyes are like the eyelids of the dawn.
11 Out of his mouth go forth torches;
    sparks of fire leap forth.
12 From his nostrils comes smoke
    as from a seething pot or bowl.
13 His breath sets coals afire;
    a flame comes from his mouth.
14 Strength abides in his neck,
    and power leaps before him.
15 The folds of his flesh stick together,
    it is cast over him and immovable.
16 His heart is cast as hard as stone;
    cast as the lower millstone.
17 When he rises up, the gods are afraid;
    when he crashes down, they fall back.
18 Should a sword reach him, it will not avail;
    nor will spear, dart, or javelin.
19 He regards iron as chaff,
    and bronze as rotten wood.
20 No arrow will put him to flight;
    slingstones used against him are but straw.
21 Clubs he regards as straw;
    he laughs at the crash of the spear.
22 Under him are sharp pottery fragments,
    spreading a threshing sledge upon the mire.
23 He makes the depths boil like a pot;
    he makes the sea like a perfume bottle.
24 Behind him he leaves a shining path;
    you would think the deep had white hair.
25 Upon the earth there is none like him,
    he was made fearless.
26 He looks over all who are haughty,
    he is king over all proud beasts.

Chapter 42

Then Job answered the Lord and said:

I know that you can do all things,[g]
    and that no purpose of yours can be hindered.
“Who is this who obscures counsel with ignorance?”
I have spoken but did not understand;
    things too marvelous for me, which I did not know.
“Listen, and I will speak;
I will question you, and you tell me the answers.”
By hearsay I had heard of you,
    but now my eye has seen you.[h]
Therefore I disown what I have said,
    and repent in dust and ashes.[i]

IX. Epilogue

Job’s Restoration. And after the Lord had spoken these words to Job, the Lord said to Eliphaz the Temanite, “My anger blazes against you and your two friends![j] You have not spoken rightly concerning me, as has my servant Job. So now take seven bulls and seven rams, and go to my servant Job, and sacrifice a burnt offering for yourselves, and let my servant Job pray for you.[k] To him I will show favor, and not punish your folly, for you have not spoken rightly concerning me, as has my servant Job.” Then Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite, went and did as the Lord had commanded them. The Lord showed favor to Job.

10 The Lord also restored the prosperity of Job, after he had prayed for his friends; the Lord even gave to Job twice[l] as much as he had before. 11 Then all his brothers and sisters came to him, and all his former acquaintances, and they dined with him in his house. They consoled and comforted him for all the evil the Lord had brought upon him, and each one gave him a piece of money[m] and a gold ring.

12 Thus the Lord blessed the later days of Job more than his earlier ones. Now he had fourteen thousand sheep, six thousand camels, a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand she-donkeys. 13 He also had seven sons and three daughters: 14 the first daughter he called Jemimah, the second Keziah, and the third Keren-happuch.[n] 15 In all the land no other women were as beautiful as the daughters of Job; and their father gave them an inheritance[o] among their brothers.

16 After this, Job lived a hundred and forty years; and he saw his children, his grandchildren, and even his great-grandchildren. 17 Then Job died, old and full of years.

Footnotes:

  1. 40:4–5 Job’s first reaction is humble, but also seemingly cautious.
  2. 40:8–14 The issue is joined in these verses, and the Lord seems to challenge Job to play God and to bring down the proud and wicked.
  3. 40:15 Behemoth: a primeval monster of chaos; identified by some scholars as the hippopotamus, on which the description of Behemoth is partially based. The point of the Behemoth-Leviathan passages is that only the Lord, not Job, can control the cosmic evil which these forces symbolize.
  4. 40:24 Eyes…nose: the only exposed parts of the submerged beast.
  5. 40:25 Leviathan: although identified by some scholars as the crocodile, it is more likely another chaos monster; see note on 3:8.
  6. 40:30 Merchants: lit., “Canaanites,” whose reputation for trading was so widespread that their name came to be used for merchants; cf. Prv 31:24.
  7. 42:2–4 In his final speech, Job quotes God’s own words (see 38:2–3; 40:7).
  8. 42:5 In 19:25–27 Job had affirmed a hope to “see” (three times) his vindicator. Now he has seen the Lord about whom he had heard so much.
  9. 42:6 A difficult verse. Some doubt, in view of God’s commendation in v. 7, that Job does in fact express repentance, and alternative translations are often given. Along with v. 5, it describes a change in Job, which the encounter with the Lord has brought about. Dust and ashes: an ambiguous phrase. It can refer to the human condition (cf. Gn 18:27; Jb 30:19) or to Job’s ash heap (2:8).
  10. 42:7 The three friends of Job (Elihu is ignored in the epilogue) are criticized by the Lord because they had “not spoken rightly” (vv. 7–8).
  11. 42:8 An ironic touch: Job becomes the intercessor for his friends.
  12. 42:10 Twice: this is the fine for damage inflicted upon another; cf. Ex 22:3. The Lord pays up!
  13. 42:11 A piece of money: lit., qesitah, value unknown; also used in Gn 33:19; Jos 24:32. Gold ring: for the nose or ear.
  14. 42:14 Job’s daughters had names symbolic of their charms: Jemimah, dove; Keziah, precious perfume (cf. Ps 45:9); Keren-happuch, cosmetic jar—more precisely, a container for a black powder used like modern mascara.
  15. 42:15 Ordinarily daughters did not inherit property unless there were no sons; cf. Nm 27:1–11.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Wisdom 12:12-27 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

12 For who can say to you, “What have you done?”
    or who can oppose your decree?
Or when peoples perish, who can challenge you, their maker;
    or who can come into your presence to vindicate the unrighteous?
13 For neither is there any god besides you who have the care of all,
    that you need show you have not unjustly condemned;
14 Nor can any king or prince confront you on behalf of those you have punished.

15 But as you are righteous, you govern all things righteously;
    you regard it as unworthy of your power
    to punish one who has incurred no blame.
16 For your might is the source of righteousness;
    your mastery over all things makes you lenient to all.
17 For you show your might when the perfection of your power is disbelieved;
    and in those who know you, you rebuke insolence.[a]
18 But though you are master of might, you judge with clemency,
    and with much lenience you govern us;
    for power, whenever you will, attends you.

19 You taught your people, by these deeds,
    that those who are righteous must be kind;
And you gave your children reason to hope
    that you would allow them to repent for their sins.
20 For these were enemies of your servants, doomed to death;
    yet, while you punished them with such solicitude and indulgence,
    granting time and opportunity to abandon wickedness,
21 With what exactitude you judged your children,
    to whose ancestors you gave the sworn covenants of goodly promises!
22 Therefore to give us a lesson you punish our enemies with measured deliberation
    so that we may think earnestly of your goodness when we judge,
    and, when being judged, we may look for mercy.

Second Example Resumed

23 Hence those unrighteous who lived a life of folly,
    you tormented through their own abominations.
24 For they went far astray in the paths of error,
    taking for gods the worthless and disgusting among beasts,
    being deceived like senseless infants.
25 Therefore as though upon unreasoning children,
    you sent your judgment on them as a mockery;
26 But they who took no heed of a punishment which was but child’s play
    were to experience a condemnation worthy of God.
27 For by the things through which they suffered distress,
    being tortured by the very things they deemed gods,
They saw and recognized the true God whom formerly they had refused to know;
    with this, their final condemnation[b] came upon them.

Footnotes:

  1. 12:17 The brunt of divine anger and justice is borne by those who know God but defy divine authority and might. Cf. 1:2; 15:2, but also 12:27; 18:13.
  2. 12:27 Condemnation: the death of Egyptian firstborn and the destruction of their army in the sea.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Luke 24:28-53 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

28 As they approached the village to which they were going, he gave the impression that he was going on farther. 29 But they urged him, “Stay with us, for it is nearly evening and the day is almost over.” So he went in to stay with them. 30 And it happened that, while he was with them at table, he took bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them. 31 With that their eyes were opened and they recognized him, but he vanished from their sight. 32 Then they said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning [within us] while he spoke to us on the way and opened the scriptures to us?” 33 So they set out at once and returned to Jerusalem where they found gathered together the eleven and those with them 34 who were saying, “The Lord has truly been raised and has appeared to Simon!” 35 Then the two recounted what had taken place on the way and how he was made known to them in the breaking of the bread.

The Appearance to the Disciples in Jerusalem. 36 [a]While they were still speaking about this, he stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be with you.” 37 But they were startled and terrified and thought that they were seeing a ghost. 38 Then he said to them, “Why are you troubled? And why do questions arise in your hearts? 39 [b]Look at my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me and see, because a ghost does not have flesh and bones as you can see I have.” 40 And as he said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. 41 While they were still incredulous for joy and were amazed, he asked them, “Have you anything here to eat?” 42 They gave him a piece of baked fish; 43 he took it and ate it in front of them.

44 He said to them, “These are my words that I spoke to you while I was still with you, that everything written about me in the law of Moses and in the prophets and psalms must be fulfilled.” 45 Then he opened their minds to understand the scriptures. 46 [c]And he said to them, “Thus it is written that the Messiah would suffer and rise from the dead on the third day 47 and that repentance, for the forgiveness of sins, would be preached in his name to all the nations, beginning from Jerusalem. 48 You are witnesses of these things. 49 And [behold] I am sending the promise of my Father[d] upon you; but stay in the city until you are clothed with power from on high.”

The Ascension.[e] 50 Then he led them [out] as far as Bethany, raised his hands, and blessed them. 51 As he blessed them he parted from them and was taken up to heaven. 52 They did him homage and then returned to Jerusalem with great joy, 53 and they were continually in the temple praising God.[f]

Footnotes:

  1. 24:36–43, 44–49 The Gospel of Luke, like each of the other gospels (Mt 28:16–20; Mk 16:14–15; Jn 20:19–23), focuses on an important appearance of Jesus to the Twelve in which they are commissioned for their future ministry. As in Lk 24:6, 12, so in Lk 24:36, 40 there are omissions in the Western text.
  2. 24:39–42 The apologetic purpose of this story is evident in the concern with the physical details and the report that Jesus ate food.
  3. 24:46 See note on Lk 24:26.
  4. 24:49 The promise of my Father: i.e., the gift of the holy Spirit.
  5. 24:50–53 Luke brings his story about the time of Jesus to a close with the report of the ascension. He will also begin the story of the time of the church with a recounting of the ascension. In the gospel, Luke recounts the ascension of Jesus on Easter Sunday night, thereby closely associating it with the resurrection. In Acts 1:3, 9–11; 13:31 he historicizes the ascension by speaking of a forty-day period between the resurrection and the ascension. The Western text omits some phrases in Lk 24:51, 52 perhaps to avoid any chronological conflict with Acts 1 about the time of the ascension.
  6. 24:53 The Gospel of Luke ends as it began (Lk 1:9), in the Jerusalem temple.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

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