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Jeremiah 15-16 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 15

The Lord said to me: Even if Moses and Samuel stood before me, my heart would not turn toward this people. Send them away from me and let them go. If they ask you, “Where should we go?” tell them, Thus says the Lord: Whoever is marked for death, to death; whoever is marked for the sword, to the sword; whoever is marked for famine, to famine; whoever is marked for captivity, to captivity. Four kinds of scourge I have decreed against them—oracle of the Lord—the sword to kill them; dogs to drag them off; the birds of the sky and the beasts of the earth to devour and destroy them. And I will make them an object of horror to all the kingdoms of the earth because of what Manasseh, son of Hezekiah, king of Judah, did in Jerusalem.

Scene of Tragedy

Who will pity you, Jerusalem,
    who will grieve for you?
Who will stop to ask
    about your welfare?
It is you who have disowned me—oracle of the Lord
    turned your back upon me;
I stretched out my hand to destroy you,
    because I was weary of relenting.
I winnowed them with a winnowing fork
    at the gates of the land;
I have bereaved, destroyed my people;
    they have not turned from their evil ways.
Their widows were more numerous before me
    than the sands of the sea.
I brought against the mother of youths
    the destroyer at midday;
Suddenly I struck her
    with anguish and terror.
The mother of seven faints away,
    breathing out her life;
Her sun sets in full day,
    she is ashamed, abashed.
Their survivors I will give to the sword
    in the presence of their enemies—oracle of the Lord.

Jeremiah’s Complaint

10 Woe to me, my mother, that you gave me birth!
    a man of strife and contention to all the land!
I neither borrow nor lend,
    yet everyone curses me.
11 Tell me, Lord, have I not served you for their good?
    Have I not interceded with you
    in time of misfortune and anguish?
12 Can one break iron,
    iron from the north, and bronze?
13 [a]Your wealth and your treasures
    I give as plunder, demanding no payment,
    because of all your sins, throughout all your territory.
14 And I shall enslave you to your enemies
    in a land you do not know,
For fire has broken out from my anger,
    it is kindled against you.
15     You know, Lord:
Remember me and take care of me,
    avenge me on my persecutors.
Because you are slow to anger, do not banish me;
    know that for you I have borne insult.
16 When I found your words, I devoured them;
    your words were my joy, the happiness of my heart,
Because I bear your name,
    Lord, God of hosts.
17 I did not sit celebrating
    in the circle of merrymakers;
Under the weight of your hand I sat alone
    because you filled me with rage.
18 Why is my pain continuous,
    my wound incurable, refusing to be healed?
To me you are like a deceptive brook,
    waters that cannot be relied on!
19     Thus the Lord answered me:
If you come back and I take you back,
    in my presence you shall stand;
If you utter what is precious and not what is worthless,
    you shall be my mouth.
Then they will be the ones who turn to you,
    not you who turn to them.
20 And I will make you toward this people
    a fortified wall of bronze.
Though they fight against you,
    they shall not prevail,
For I am with you,
    to save and rescue you—oracle of the Lord.
21 I will rescue you from the hand of the wicked,
    and ransom you from the power of the violent.

Chapter 16

Jeremiah’s Life a Warning. This word came to me from the Lord: Do not take a wife and do not have sons and daughters in this place, for thus says the Lord concerning the sons and daughters born in this place, the mothers who give them birth, the fathers who beget them in this land: Of deadly disease they shall die. Unlamented and unburied they will lie like dung on the ground. Sword and famine will make an end of them, and their corpses will become food for the birds of the sky and the beasts of the earth.

Thus says the Lord: Do not go into a house of mourning; do not go there to lament or grieve for them. For I have withdrawn my peace from this people—oracle of the Lord—my love and my compassion. They shall die, the great and the lowly, in this land, unburied and unlamented.[b] No one will gash themselves or shave their heads for them. They will not break bread with the bereaved to offer consolation for the dead; they will not give them the cup of consolation to drink over the death of father or mother.

Do not enter a house of feasting to sit eating and drinking with them. For thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Before your eyes and in your lifetime, I will silence in this place the song of joy and the song of gladness, the song of the bridegroom and the song of the bride.

10 When you proclaim all these words to this people and they ask you: “Why has the Lord pronounced all this great disaster against us? What is our crime? What sin have we committed against the Lord, our God?”— 11 you shall answer them: It is because your ancestors have forsaken me—oracle of the Lord—and followed other gods that they served and worshiped; but me they have forsaken, and my law they did not keep. 12 And you have done worse than your ancestors. Here you are, every one of you, walking in the stubbornness of your evil heart instead of listening to me. 13 I will throw you out of this land into a land that neither you nor your ancestors have known; there you can serve other gods day and night because I will not show you mercy.

Return from Exile. 14 Therefore, days are coming—oracle of the Lord—when it will no longer be said, “As the Lord lives, who brought the Israelites out of Egypt”; 15 but rather, “As the Lord lives, who brought the Israelites out of the land of the north and out of all the countries to which he had banished them.” I will bring them back to the land I gave their ancestors.

Double Punishment. 16 Look!—oracle of the Lord—I will send many fishermen to catch them. After that, I will send many hunters to hunt them out from every mountain and hill and rocky crevice. 17 For my eyes are upon all their ways; they are not hidden from me, nor does their guilt escape my sight. 18 I will at once repay them double for their crime and their sin because they profaned my land with the corpses of their detestable idols, and filled my heritage with their abominations.

Conversion of the Nations

19 Lord, my strength, my fortress,
    my refuge in the day of distress!
To you nations will come
    from the ends of the earth, and say,
“Our ancestors inherited mere frauds,
    empty, worthless.”
20 Can human beings make for themselves gods?
    But these are not gods at all!
21 Therefore, I will indeed give them knowledge;
    this time I will make them acknowledge
My strength and my power:
    they shall know that my name is Lord.

Footnotes:

  1. 15:13–14 Though the wording of these verses is close to that in 17:3–4, the present passage is evidently God’s word to Jeremiah, whereas 17:3–4 is evidently a word of judgment on Judah. It is noteworthy that the references to “you” in the present passage are singular, until a shift to plural in “against you” in the last line; this “you” is then doubtless a reference to both the prophet and his enemies.
  2. 16:6–7 These verses refer to popular mourning practices in the land; cf. Dt 14:1–2.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Ben Sira 13:1-13 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 13

Caution Regarding Associates[a]

Touch pitch and you blacken your hand;
    associate with scoundrels and you learn their ways.
Do not lift a weight too heavy for you,
    or associate with anyone wealthier than you.
How can the clay pot go with the metal cauldron?
    When they knock together, the pot will be smashed:
The rich do wrong and boast of it,
    while the poor are wronged and beg forgiveness.
As long as the rich can use you they will enslave you,
    but when you are down and out they will abandon you.
As long as you have anything they will live with you,
    but they will drain you dry without remorse.
When they need you they will deceive you
    and smile at you and raise your hopes;
    they will speak kindly to you and say, “What do you need?”
They will embarrass you at their dinner parties,
    and finally laugh at you.
Afterwards, when they see you, they will pass you by,
    and shake their heads at you.
Be on guard: do not act too boldly;
    do not be like those who lack sense.

When the influential draw near, keep your distance;
    then they will urge you all the more.
10 Do not draw too close, lest you be rebuffed,
    but do not keep too far away lest you be regarded as an enemy.
11 Do not venture to be free with them,
    do not trust their many words;
For by prolonged talk they will test you,
    and though smiling they will probe you.
12 Mercilessly they will make you a laughingstock,
    and will not refrain from injury or chains.
13 Be on your guard and take care
    never to accompany lawless people.[b]

Footnotes:

  1. 13:1–14:2 By means of various images, most of them unfavorable to the rich, Ben Sira indicates the practical impossibility of genuine and sincere companionship between the poor and the rich. He lays down a principle of associating with equals (13:6–19).
  2. 13:13

    Other ancient texts read as v. 14:

    If you hear these things in your sleep, wake up!

    With your whole life, love the Lord

    and call on him for your salvation.

New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

John 2 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 2

The Wedding at Cana. [a]On the third day there was a wedding[b] in Cana[c] in Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. Jesus and his disciples were also invited to the wedding. When the wine ran short, the mother of Jesus said to him, “They have no wine.” [d][And] Jesus said to her, “Woman, how does your concern affect me? My hour has not yet come.” His mother said to the servers, “Do whatever he tells you.” [e]Now there were six stone water jars there for Jewish ceremonial washings, each holding twenty to thirty gallons. Jesus told them, “Fill the jars with water.” So they filled them to the brim. Then he told them, “Draw some out now and take it to the headwaiter.”[f] So they took it. And when the headwaiter tasted the water that had become wine, without knowing where it came from (although the servers who had drawn the water knew), the headwaiter called the bridegroom 10 and said to him, “Everyone serves good wine first, and then when people have drunk freely, an inferior one; but you have kept the good wine until now.” 11 Jesus did this as the beginning of his signs[g] in Cana in Galilee and so revealed his glory, and his disciples began to believe in him.

12 [h]After this, he and his mother, [his] brothers, and his disciples went down to Capernaum and stayed there only a few days.[i]

Cleansing of the Temple. 13 [j]Since the Passover[k] of the Jews was near, Jesus went up to Jerusalem. 14 [l]He found in the temple area those who sold oxen, sheep, and doves,[m] as well as the money-changers seated there. 15 He made a whip out of cords and drove them all out of the temple area, with the sheep and oxen, and spilled the coins of the money-changers and overturned their tables, 16 and to those who sold doves he said, “Take these out of here, and stop making my Father’s house a marketplace.” 17 [n]His disciples recalled the words of scripture, “Zeal for your house will consume me.” 18 At this the Jews answered and said to him, “What sign can you show us for doing this?” 19 Jesus answered and said to them,[o] “Destroy this temple and in three days I will raise it up.” 20 The Jews said, “This temple has been under construction for forty-six years,[p] and you will raise it up in three days?” 21 But he was speaking about the temple of his body. 22 Therefore, when he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this, and they came to believe the scripture and the word Jesus had spoken.

23 While he was in Jerusalem for the feast of Passover, many began to believe in his name when they saw the signs he was doing. 24 But Jesus would not trust himself to them because he knew them all, 25 and did not need anyone to testify about human nature. He himself understood it well.

Footnotes:

  1. 2:1–6:71 Signs revealing Jesus as the Messiah to all Israel. “Sign” (sēmeion) is John’s symbolic term for Jesus’ wondrous deeds (see Introduction). The Old Testament background lies in the Exodus story (cf. Dt 11:3; 29:2). John is interested primarily in what the sēmeia signify: God’s intervention in human history in a new way through Jesus.
  2. 2:1–11 The first sign. This story of replacement of Jewish ceremonial washings (Jn 2:6) presents the initial revelation about Jesus at the outset of his ministry. He manifests his glory; the disciples believe. There is no synoptic parallel.
  3. 2:1 Cana: unknown from the Old Testament. The mother of Jesus: she is never named in John.
  4. 2:4 This verse may seek to show that Jesus did not work miracles to help his family and friends, as in the apocryphal gospels. Woman: a normal, polite form of address, but unattested in reference to one’s mother. Cf. also Jn 19:26. How does your concern affect me?: literally, “What is this to me and to you?”—a Hebrew expression of either hostility (Jgs 11:12; 2 Chr 35:21; 1 Kgs 17:18) or denial of common interest (Hos 14:9; 2 Kgs 3:13). Cf. Mk 1:24; 5:7 used by demons to Jesus. My hour has not yet come: the translation as a question (“Has not my hour now come?”), while preferable grammatically and supported by Greek Fathers, seems unlikely from a comparison with Jn 7:6, 30. The “hour” is that of Jesus’ passion, death, resurrection, and ascension (Jn 13:1).
  5. 2:6 Twenty to thirty gallons: literally, “two or three measures”; the Attic liquid measure contained 39.39 liters. The vast quantity recalls prophecies of abundance in the last days; cf. Am 9:13–14; Hos 14:7; Jer 31:12.
  6. 2:8 Headwaiter: used of the official who managed a banquet, but there is no evidence of such a functionary in Palestine. Perhaps here a friend of the family acted as master of ceremonies; cf. Sir 32:1.
  7. 2:11 The beginning of his signs: the first of seven (see Introduction).
  8. 2:12–3:21 The next three episodes take place in Jerusalem. Only the first is paralleled in the synoptic gospels.
  9. 2:12 This transitional verse may be a harmonization with the synoptic tradition in Lk 4:31 and Mt 4:13. There are many textual variants. John depicts no extended ministry in Capernaum as do the synoptics.
  10. 2:13–22 This episode indicates the post-resurrectional replacement of the temple by the person of Jesus.
  11. 2:13 Passover: this is the first Passover mentioned in John; a second is mentioned in Jn 6:4; a third in Jn 13:1. Taken literally, they point to a ministry of at least two years.
  12. 2:14–22 The other gospels place the cleansing of the temple in the last days of Jesus’ life (Matthew, on the day Jesus entered Jerusalem; Mark, on the next day). The order of events in the gospel narratives is often determined by theological motives rather than by chronological data.
  13. 2:14 Oxen, sheep, and doves: intended for sacrifice. The doves were the offerings of the poor (Lv 5:7). Money-changers: for a temple tax paid by every male Jew more than nineteen years of age, with a half-shekel coin (Ex 30:11–16), in Syrian currency. See note on Mt 17:24.
  14. 2:17 Ps 69:10, changed to future tense to apply to Jesus.
  15. 2:19 This saying about the destruction of the temple occurs in various forms (Mt 24:2; 27:40; Mk 13:2; 15:29; Lk 21:6; cf. Acts 6:14). Mt 26:61 has: “I can destroy the temple of God…”; see note there. In Mk 14:58, there is a metaphorical contrast with a new temple: “I will destroy this temple made with hands and within three days I will build another not made with hands.” Here it is symbolic of Jesus’ resurrection and the resulting community (see Jn 2:21 and Rev 21:2). In three days: an Old Testament expression for a short, indefinite period of time; cf. Hos 6:2.
  16. 2:20 Forty-six years: based on references in Josephus (Jewish Wars 1:401; Antiquities 15:380), possibly the spring of A.D. 28. Cf. note on Lk 3:1.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

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