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Isaiah 17-19 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 17

Damascus

    Oracle on Damascus:[a]
See, Damascus shall cease to be a city
    and become a pile of ruins;
Her cities shall be forever abandoned,
    for flocks to lie in undisturbed.
The fortress shall vanish from Ephraim[b]
    and dominion from Damascus;
The remnant of Aram shall become like the glory
    of the Israelites—
    oracle of the Lord of hosts.
    On that day
The glory of Jacob shall fade,
    and his full body shall grow thin.
Like the reaper’s mere armful of stalks,
    when he gathers the standing grain;
Or as when one gleans the ears
    in the Valley of Rephaim.[c]
[d]Only gleanings shall be left in it,
    as when an olive tree has been beaten—
Two or three olives at the very top,
    four or five on its most fruitful branches—
    oracle of the Lord, the God of Israel.
On that day people shall turn to their maker,
    their eyes shall look to the Holy One of Israel.
They shall not turn to the altars, the work of their hands,
    nor shall they look to what their fingers have made:
    the asherahs[e] or the incense stands.
On that day his strong cities shall be
    like those abandoned by the Hivites and Amorites
When faced with the Israelites;
    and there shall be desolation.
10 Truly, you have forgotten the God who saves you,
    the Rock, your refuge, you have not remembered.
Therefore, though you plant plants for the Pleasant One,[f]
    and set out cuttings for a foreign one,
11 Though you make them grow the day you plant them
    and make them blossom the morning you set them out,
The harvest shall disappear on a day of sickness
    and incurable pain.
12 Ah! the roaring of many peoples—[g]
    a roar like the roar of the seas!
The thundering of nations—
    thunder like the thundering of mighty waters!
13 [h]But God shall rebuke them,
    and they shall flee far away,
Driven like chaff on the mountains before a wind,
    like tumbleweed before a storm.
14 At evening, there is terror,
    but before morning, they are gone!
Such is the portion of those who despoil us,
    the lot of those who plunder us.

Chapter 18

Ethiopia

Ah! Land of buzzing insects,[i]
    beyond the rivers of Ethiopia,
Sending ambassadors by sea,
    in papyrus boats on the waters!
Go, swift messengers,
    to a nation tall and bronzed,
To a people dreaded near and far,
    a nation strong and conquering,
    whose land is washed by rivers.
[j]All you who inhabit the world,
    who dwell on earth,
When the signal is raised on the mountain, look!
    When the trumpet blows, listen!
For thus says the Lord to me:
    I will be quiet, looking on from where I dwell,
Like the shimmering heat in sunshine,
    like a cloud of dew at harvest time.
Before the vintage, when the flowering has ended,
    and the blooms are succeeded by ripening grapes,
Then comes the cutting of branches with pruning hooks,
    and the discarding of the lopped-off shoots.
They shall all be left to the mountain vultures
    and to the beasts of the earth;
The vultures shall summer on them,
    all the beasts of the earth shall winter on them.

Then will gifts be brought to the Lord of hosts—to the place of the name of the Lord of hosts, Mount Zion—from a people tall and bronzed, from a people dreaded near and far, a nation strong and conquering, whose land is washed by rivers.

Chapter 19

Egypt

    Oracle on Egypt:
See, the Lord is riding on a swift cloud
    on his way to Egypt;
The idols of Egypt tremble before him,
    the hearts of the Egyptians melt within them.
I will stir up Egypt against Egypt:
    brother will war against brother,
Neighbor against neighbor,
    city against city, kingdom against kingdom.
The courage of the Egyptians shall ebb away within them,
    and I will bring their counsel to nought;
They shall consult idols and charmers, ghosts and clairvoyants.
I will deliver Egypt
    into the power of a cruel master,
A harsh king[k] who shall rule over them—
    oracle of the Lord, the Lord of hosts.
The waters shall be drained from the sea,
    the river shall parch and dry up;
Its streams shall become foul,
    and the canals of Egypt shall dwindle and parch.
Reeds and rushes shall wither away,
    and bulrushes on the bank of the Nile;
All the sown land along the Nile
    shall dry up and blow away, and be no more.
The fishermen shall mourn and lament,
    all who cast hook in the Nile;
Those who spread their nets in the water
    shall pine away.
The linen-workers shall be disappointed,
    the combers and weavers shall turn pale;
10 The spinners shall be crushed,
    all the hired laborers shall be despondent.
11 Utter fools are the princes of Zoan![l]
    the wisest of Pharaoh’s advisers give stupid counsel.
How can you say to Pharaoh,
    “I am a descendant of wise men, of ancient kings”?
12 Where then are your wise men?
    Let them tell you and make known
What the Lord of hosts has planned
    against Egypt.
13 The princes of Zoan have become fools,
    the princes of Memphis have been deceived.
The chiefs of its tribes
    have led Egypt astray.
14 The Lord has prepared among them
    a spirit of dizziness,
And they have made Egypt stagger in whatever she does,
    as a drunkard staggers in his vomit.
15 Egypt shall accomplish nothing—
    neither head nor tail, palm branch nor reed,[m] shall accomplish anything.

16 On that day the Egyptians shall be like women, trembling with fear, because of the Lord of hosts shaking his fist at them. 17 And the land of Judah shall be a terror to the Egyptians. Every time they think of Judah, they shall stand in dread because of the plan the Lord of hosts has in mind for them.

18 On that day there shall be five cities[n] in the land of Egypt that speak the language of Canaan and swear by the Lord of hosts; one shall be called “City of the Sun.”

19 On that day there shall be an altar to the Lord at the center of Egypt, and a sacred pillar to the Lord near its boundary. 20 This will be a sign and witness to the Lord of hosts in the land of Egypt, so that when they cry out to the Lord because of their oppressors, he will send them a savior to defend and deliver them. 21 The Lord shall make himself known to Egypt, and the Egyptians shall know the Lord in that day; they shall offer sacrifices and oblations, make vows to the Lord and fulfill them. 22 Although the Lord shall smite Egypt severely, he shall heal them; they shall turn to the Lord and he shall be moved by their entreaty and heal them.

23 On that day there shall be a highway from Egypt to Assyria; the Assyrians shall enter Egypt, and the Egyptians enter Assyria, and the Egyptians shall worship with the Assyrians.

24 On that day Israel shall be a third party with Egypt and Assyria, a blessing in the midst of the earth, 25 when the Lord of hosts gives this blessing: “Blessed be my people Egypt, and the work of my hands Assyria, and my heritage, Israel.”

Footnotes:

  1. 17:1 Damascus: capital of Aram or Syria, conquered by Tiglath-pileser III at the end of the Syro-Ephraimite War in 732 B.C.
  2. 17:3 Ephraim: Israel, leagued with Aram against Judah in the Syro-Ephraimite War. Assyria ravaged and captured most of Israelite territory in 734–733 B.C. Like the glory of the Israelites: the remnant of Aram will be no more impressive than the pitiful remnant of the Northern Kingdom.
  3. 17:5 Valley of Rephaim: a fertile plain just to the southwest of Jerusalem (cf. Jos 15:8; 2 Sm 5:18). Since it was near a large population center, the fields there would be thoroughly gleaned by the poor after the harvest, leaving very few ears of grain.
  4. 17:6 Olives not easily picked by hand were knocked from the tree by means of a long stick; cf. 24:13.
  5. 17:8 Asherahs: see note on Ex 34:13. Incense stands: small altars on which incense was burned; cf. Is 27:9; Lv 26:30.
  6. 17:10 The Pleasant One: an epithet for a foreign god of fertility, probably Adonis, in whose honor saplings were planted.
  7. 17:12 Many peoples: the hordes that accompanied the invading Assyrians, whom God repels just as he vanquished the primeval waters of chaos; see notes on Jb 3:8; 7:12; Ps 89:11.
  8. 17:13–14 The passage seems to evoke the motif of invincibility, part of the early Zion tradition that Jerusalem could not be conquered because God protected it (Ps 48:1–8).
  9. 18:1–2 Land of buzzing insects: the region of the Upper Nile where these multiplied with great rapidity. Ethiopia: in Hebrew, Kush. The center of this ancient kingdom corresponds geographically to the modern Sudan, Roman Nubia. Papyrus boats: light and serviceable vessels made of bundles of papyrus stalks and sealed with pitch. Egypt, ruled by a dynasty from Ethiopia, had invited Judah to join a coalition against Assyria, but Isaiah told the ambassadors to return to their own people.
  10. 18:3–6 A more general address but probably relating to the same topic. The Lord will not act at once, but later there will be a “harvest” of terrible destruction, probably directed against Assyria (cf. 14:24–27).
  11. 19:4 Cruel master…harsh king: possibly the Nubian (Ethiopian) Shabaka who gained control of all of Egypt around 712 B.C.
  12. 19:11, 13 Zoan, later known as Tanis, and Memphis (Hebrew Noph) were key cities in the Nile Delta.
  13. 19:15 Head…reed: the leaders and the people; cf. 9:13–14.
  14. 19:18 Five cities: colonies of Jews living together and speaking their native language; cf. Jer 43. City of the Sun: the meaning is uncertain, but the reference seems to be to the city known later as Heliopolis.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Wisdom 16:15-29 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

15 Your hand no one can escape.

Third Example: A Rain of Manna for Israel Instead of the Plague of Storms

16 For the wicked who refused to know you
    were punished by the might of your arm,
Were pursued by unusual rains and hailstorms and unremitting downpours,
    and were consumed by fire.
17 For against all expectation, in water which quenches everything,
    the fire grew more active;
For the universe fights on behalf of the righteous.
18 Then the flame was tempered
    so that the beasts that were sent upon the wicked might not be burnt up,
    but that these might see and know that they were struck by the judgment of God;
19 And again, even in the water, fire blazed beyond its strength
    so as to consume the produce of the wicked land.
20 Instead of this, you nourished your people with food of angels[a]
    and furnished them bread from heaven, ready to hand, untoiled-for,
    endowed with all delights and conforming to every taste.
21 For this substance of yours revealed your sweetness toward your children,
    and serving the desire of the one who received it,
    was changed to whatever flavor each one wished.
22 Yet snow and ice[b] withstood fire and were not melted,
    so that they might know that their enemies’ fruits
Were consumed by a fire that blazed in the hail
    and flashed lightning in the rain.

23 But this fire, again, in order that the righteous might be nourished,
    forgot even its proper strength;
24 For your creation, serving you, its maker,
    grows tense for punishment against the wicked,
    but is relaxed in benefit for those who trust in you.
25 Therefore at that very time, transformed in all sorts of ways,
    it was serving your all-nourishing bounty
    according to what they needed and desired;
26 That your children whom you loved might learn, O Lord,
    that it is not the various kinds of fruits that nourish,
    but your word that preserves those who believe you!
27 For what was not destroyed by fire,
    melted when merely warmed by a momentary sunbeam;
28 To make known that one must give you thanks before sunrise,
    and turn to you at daybreak.
29 For the hope of the ungrateful melts like a wintry frost
    and runs off like useless water.

Footnotes:

  1. 16:20 Food of angels: the famous phrase (cf. the hymn “Panis Angelicus”) is taken from Ps 78:24 as rendered by the Septuagint. The “bread from heaven” (cf. Ex 16:4; Ps 105:40) with its marvelous “sweetness” becomes a type of the “bread come down from heaven” in Jn 6:32–51, and plays a large role in later Christian devotion.
  2. 16:22 Snow and ice: the manna; cf. v. 27; 19:21.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Titus 1 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

I. Address

Chapter 1

Greeting.[a] Paul, a slave of God and apostle of Jesus Christ for the sake of the faith of God’s chosen ones and the recognition of religious truth, in the hope of eternal life that God, who does not lie, promised before time began, who indeed at the proper time revealed his word in the proclamation with which I was entrusted by the command of God our savior, to Titus, my true child in our common faith: grace and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our savior.

II. Pastoral Charge

Titus in Crete. [b]For this reason I left you in Crete so that you might set right what remains to be done and appoint presbyters in every town, as I directed you, on condition that a man be blameless, married only once, with believing children who are not accused of licentiousness or rebellious. For a bishop as God’s steward must be blameless, not arrogant, not irritable, not a drunkard, not aggressive, not greedy for sordid gain, but hospitable, a lover of goodness, temperate, just, holy, and self-controlled, holding fast to the true message as taught so that he will be able both to exhort with sound doctrine and to refute opponents. 10 [c]For there are also many rebels, idle talkers and deceivers, especially the Jewish Christians.[d] 11 It is imperative to silence them, as they are upsetting whole families by teaching for sordid gain what they should not. 12 One of them, a prophet of their own, once said, “Cretans have always been liars, vicious beasts, and lazy gluttons.”[e] 13 That testimony is true. Therefore, admonish them sharply, so that they may be sound in the faith, 14 instead of paying attention to Jewish myths and regulations of people who have repudiated the truth. 15 To the clean all things are clean, but to those who are defiled and unbelieving nothing is clean; in fact, both their minds and their consciences are tainted. 16 They claim to know God, but by their deeds they deny him. They are vile and disobedient and unqualified for any good deed.

Footnotes:

  1. 1:1–4 On the epistolary form, see note on Rom 1:1–7. The apostolate is the divinely appointed mission to lead others to the true faith and through it to eternal salvation (Ti 1:1–3).
  2. 1:5–9 This instruction on the selection and appointment of presbyters, substantially identical with that in 1 Tm 3:1–7 on a bishop (see note there), was aimed at strengthening the authority of Titus by apostolic mandate; cf. Ti 2:15. In Ti 1:5, 7 and Acts 20:17, 28, the terms episkopos and presbyteros (“bishop” and “presbyter”) refer to the same persons. Deacons are not mentioned in Titus. See also note on Phil 1:1.
  3. 1:10–16 This adverse criticism of the defects within the community is directed especially against certain Jewish Christians, who busy themselves with useless speculations over persons mentioned in the Old Testament, insist on the observance of Jewish ritual purity regulations, and thus upset whole families by teaching things they have no right to teach; cf. Ti 3:9; 1 Tm 1:3–10.
  4. 1:10 Jewish Christians: literally, “those of the circumcision.”
  5. 1:12 Cretans…gluttons: quoted from Epimenides, a Cretan poet of the sixth century B.C.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

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