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Exodus 15 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Chapter 15

Then Moses and the Israelites sang this song to the Lord:[a]

I will sing to the Lord, for he is gloriously triumphant;
    horse and chariot he has cast into the sea.
My strength and my refuge is the Lord,
    and he has become my savior.
This is my God, I praise him;
    the God of my father, I extol him.
The Lord is a warrior,
    Lord is his name!
Pharaoh’s chariots and army he hurled into the sea;
    the elite of his officers were drowned in the Red Sea.[b]
The flood waters covered them,
    they sank into the depths like a stone.
Your right hand, O Lord, magnificent in power,
    your right hand, O Lord, shattered the enemy.
In your great majesty you overthrew your adversaries;
    you loosed your wrath to consume them like stubble.
At the blast of your nostrils the waters piled up,
    the flowing waters stood like a mound,
    the flood waters foamed in the midst of the sea.
The enemy boasted, “I will pursue and overtake them;
    I will divide the spoils and have my fill of them;
    I will draw my sword; my hand will despoil them!”
10 When you blew with your breath, the sea covered them;
    like lead they sank in the mighty waters.
11 Who is like you among the gods, O Lord?
    Who is like you, magnificent among the holy ones?
Awe-inspiring in deeds of renown, worker of wonders,
12     when you stretched out your right hand, the earth swallowed them!
13 In your love[c] you led the people you redeemed;
    in your strength you guided them to your holy dwelling.
14 The peoples heard and quaked;
    anguish gripped the dwellers in Philistia.
15 Then were the chieftains of Edom dismayed,
    the nobles of Moab seized by trembling;
All the inhabitants of Canaan melted away;
16     terror and dread fell upon them.
By the might of your arm they became silent like stone,
    while your people, Lord, passed over,
    while the people whom you created passed over.[d]
17 You brought them in, you planted them
    on the mountain that is your own—
The place you made the base of your throne, Lord,
    the sanctuary, Lord, your hands established.
18 May the Lord reign forever and ever!

19 When Pharaoh’s horses and chariots and horsemen entered the sea, the Lord made the waters of the sea flow back upon them, though the Israelites walked on dry land through the midst of the sea. 20 Then the prophet Miriam, Aaron’s sister, took a tambourine in her hand, while all the women went out after her with tambourines, dancing; 21 and she responded[e] to them:

Sing to the Lord, for he is gloriously triumphant;
    horse and chariot he has cast into the sea.

V. The Journey in the Wilderness to Sinai

At Marah and Elim. 22 Then Moses led Israel forward from the Red Sea,[f] and they marched out to the wilderness of Shur. After traveling for three days through the wilderness without finding water, 23 they arrived at Marah, where they could not drink its water, because it was too bitter. Hence this place was called Marah. 24 As the people grumbled against Moses, saying, “What are we to drink?” 25 he cried out to the Lord, who pointed out to him a piece of wood. When he threw it into the water, the water became fresh.

It was here that God, in making statutes and ordinances for them, put them to the test. 26 He said: If you listen closely to the voice of the Lord, your God, and do what is right in his eyes: if you heed his commandments and keep all his statutes, I will not afflict you with any of the diseases with which I afflicted the Egyptians; for I, the Lord, am your healer.

27 Then they came to Elim, where there were twelve springs of water and seventy palm trees, and they camped there near the water.

Footnotes:

  1. 15:1–21

    This poem, regarded by many scholars as one of the oldest compositions in the Bible, was once an independent work. It has been inserted at this important juncture in the large narrative of Exodus to celebrate God’s saving power, having miraculously delivered the people from their enemies, and ultimately leading them to the promised land.

    Although the victory it describes over the Egyptians at the sea bears a superficial resemblance in v. 8 to the preceding depiction of the water standing like a wall (14:22), the poem (as opposed to the following prose verse, v. 19) suggests a different version of the victory at sea than that found in chap. 14. There is no splitting of the sea in an act reminiscent of the Lord’s combat at creation with the sea monsters Rahab and Leviathan (Jb 9:13; 26:12; Ps 74:13–14; 89:11; Is 51:9–10); nor is there mention of an east wind driving the waters back so that the Israelites can cross. In this version it is by means of a storm at sea, caused by a ferocious blast from his nostrils, that the Lord achieves a decisive victory against Pharaoh and his army (vv. 1–12). The second half of the poem (vv. 13–18) describes God’s guidance into the promised land.

  2. 15:4 Red Sea: the traditional translation of the Hebrew yam suph, which actually means “Sea of Reeds” or “reedy sea.” The location is uncertain, though in view of the route taken by the Israelites from Egypt to Sinai, it could not have been the Red Sea, which is too far south. It was probably a smaller body of water south of the Gulf of Suez. The term occurs also in Exodus at 10:19; 13:18; and 23:31.
  3. 15:13 Love: the very important Hebrew term hesed carries a variety of nuances depending on context: love, kindness, faithfulness. It is often rendered “steadfast love.” It implies a relationship that generates an obligation and therefore is at home in a covenant context. Cf. 20:6.
  4. 15:16 Passed over: an allusion to the crossing of the Jordan River (cf. Jos 3–5), written as if the entry into the promised land had already occurred. This verse suggests that at one time there was a ritual enactment of the conquest at a shrine near the Jordan River which included also a celebration of the victory at the sea.
  5. 15:21 She responded: Miriam’s refrain echoes the first verse of this song and was probably sung as an antiphon after each verse.
  6. 15:22 Red Sea: see note on Ex 15:4.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Psalm 40 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Psalm 40[a]

Gratitude and Prayer for Help

For the leader. A psalm of David.

A

Surely, I wait for the Lord;
    who bends down to me and hears my cry,
Draws me up from the pit of destruction,
    out of the muddy clay,
Sets my feet upon rock,
    steadies my steps,
And puts a new song[b] in my mouth,
    a hymn to our God.
Many shall look on in fear
    and they shall trust in the Lord.
Blessed the man who sets
    his security in the Lord,
    who turns not to the arrogant
    or to those who stray after falsehood.
You, yes you, O Lord, my God,
    have done many wondrous deeds!
And in your plans for us
    there is none to equal you.
Should I wish to declare or tell them,
    too many are they to recount.
[c]Sacrifice and offering you do not want;
    you opened my ears.
Holocaust and sin-offering you do not request;
    so I said, “See; I come
    with an inscribed scroll written upon me.
I delight to do your will, my God;
    your law is in my inner being!”
10 When I sing of your righteousness
    in a great assembly,
See, I do not restrain my lips;
    as you, Lord, know.
11 I do not conceal your righteousness
    within my heart;
I speak of your loyalty and your salvation.
    I do not hide your mercy or faithfulness from a great assembly.
12 Lord, may you not withhold
    your compassion from me;
May your mercy and your faithfulness
    continually protect me.

B

13 But evils surround me
    until they cannot be counted.
My sins overtake me,
    so that I can no longer see.
They are more numerous than the hairs of my head;
    my courage fails me.
14 Lord, graciously rescue me!
    Come quickly to help me, Lord!
15 May those who seek to destroy my life
    be shamed and confounded.
Turn back in disgrace
    those who desire my ruin.
16 Let those who say to me “Aha!”
    Be made desolate on account of their shame.
17 While those who seek you
    rejoice and be glad in you.
May those who long for your salvation
    always say, “The Lord is great.”
18 Though I am afflicted and poor,
    my Lord keeps me in mind.
You are my help and deliverer;
    my God, do not delay!

Footnotes:

  1. Psalm 40 A thanksgiving (Ps 40:2–13) has been combined with a lament (Ps 40:14–17) that appears also in Ps 70. The psalmist describes the rescue in spatial terms—being raised up from the swampy underworld to firm earth where one can praise God (Ps 40:2–4). All who trust God will experience like protection (Ps 40:5–6)! The Psalm stipulates the precise mode of thanksgiving: not animal sacrifice but open and enthusiastic proclamation of the salvation just experienced (Ps 40:7–11). A prayer for protection concludes (Ps 40:12–17).
  2. 40:4 A new song: a song in response to the new action of God (cf. Ps 33:3; 96:1; 144:9; 149:1; Is 42:10). Giving thanks is not purely a human response but is itself a divine gift.
  3. 40:7–9 Obedience is better than sacrifice (cf. 1 Sm 15:22; Is 1:10–20; Hos 6:6; Am 5:22–25; Mi 6:6–8; Acts 7:42–43 [quoting Am 5:25–26]). Hb 10:5–9 quotes the somewhat different Greek version and interprets it as Christ’s self-oblation.
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Matthew 22:23-46 New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

23 On that day Sadducees approached him, saying that there is no resurrection.[a] They put this question to him, 24 saying, “Teacher, Moses said, ‘If a man dies[b] without children, his brother shall marry his wife and raise up descendants for his brother.’ 25 Now there were seven brothers among us. The first married and died and, having no descendants, left his wife to his brother. 26 The same happened with the second and the third, through all seven. 27 Finally the woman died. 28 Now at the resurrection, of the seven, whose wife will she be? For they all had been married to her.” 29 [c]Jesus said to them in reply, “You are misled because you do not know the scriptures or the power of God. 30 At the resurrection they neither marry nor are given in marriage but are like the angels in heaven. 31 And concerning the resurrection of the dead, have you not read what was said to you[d] by God, 32 ‘I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’? He is not the God of the dead but of the living.” 33 When the crowds heard this, they were astonished at his teaching.

The Greatest Commandment.[e] 34 When the Pharisees heard that he had silenced the Sadducees, they gathered together, 35 and one of them [a scholar of the law][f] tested him by asking, 36 “Teacher,[g] which commandment in the law is the greatest?” 37 He said to him,[h] “You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. 38 This is the greatest and the first commandment. 39 The second is like it:[i] You shall love your neighbor as yourself. 40 [j]The whole law and the prophets depend on these two commandments.”

The Question About David’s Son.[k] 41 While the Pharisees were gathered together, Jesus questioned them,[l] 42 [m]saying, “What is your opinion about the Messiah? Whose son is he?” They replied, “David’s.” 43 He said to them, “How, then, does David, inspired by the Spirit, call him ‘lord,’ saying:

44 ‘The Lord said to my lord,
    “Sit at my right hand
    until I place your enemies under your feet”’?

45 [n]If David calls him ‘lord,’ how can he be his son?” 46 No one was able to answer him a word, nor from that day on did anyone dare to ask him any more questions.

Footnotes:

  1. 22:23 Saying that there is no resurrection: in the Marcan parallel (Mk 22:12, 18) the Sadducees are correctly defined as those “who say there is no resurrection”; see also Lk 20:27. Matthew’s rewording of Mark can mean that these particular Sadducees deny the resurrection, which would imply that he was not aware that the denial was characteristic of the party. For some scholars this is an indication of his being a Gentile Christian; see note on Mt 21:4–5.
  2. 22:24 ‘If a man dies…his brother’: this is known as the “law of the levirate,” from the Latin levir, “brother-in-law.” Its purpose was to continue the family line of the deceased brother (Dt 25:6).
  3. 22:29 The sexual relationships of this world will be transcended; the risen body will be the work of the creative power of God.
  4. 22:31–32 Cf. Ex 3:6. In the Pentateuch, which the Sadducees accepted as normative for Jewish belief and practice, God speaks even now (to you) of himself as the God of the patriarchs who died centuries ago. He identifies himself in relation to them, and because of their relation to him, the living God, they too are alive. This might appear no argument for the resurrection, but simply for life after death as conceived in Wis 3:1–3. But the general thought of early first-century Judaism was not influenced by that conception; for it human immortality was connected with the existence of the body.
  5. 22:34–40 The Marcan parallel (Mk 12:28–34) is an exchange between Jesus and a scribe who is impressed by the way in which Jesus has conducted himself in the previous controversy (Mk 12:28), who compliments him for the answer he gives him (Mk 12:32), and who is said by Jesus to be “not far from the kingdom of God” (Mk 12:34). Matthew has sharpened that scene. The questioner, as the representative of other Pharisees, tests Jesus by his question (Mt 22:34–35), and both his reaction to Jesus’ reply and Jesus’ commendation of him are lacking.
  6. 22:35 [A scholar of the law]: meaning “scribe.” Although this reading is supported by the vast majority of textual witnesses, it is the only time that the Greek word so translated occurs in Matthew. It is relatively frequent in Luke, and there is reason to think that it may have been added here by a copyist since it occurs in the Lucan parallel (Lk 10:25–28). Tested: see note on Mt 19:3.
  7. 22:36 For the devout Jew all the commandments were to be kept with equal care, but there is evidence of preoccupation in Jewish sources with the question put to Jesus.
  8. 22:37–38 Cf. Dt 6:5. Matthew omits the first part of Mark’s fuller quotation (Mk 12:29; Dt 6:4–5), probably because he considered its monotheistic emphasis needless for his church. The love of God must engage the total person (heart, soul, mind).
  9. 22:39 Jesus goes beyond the extent of the question put to him and joins to the greatest and the first commandment a second, that of love of neighbor, Lv 19:18; see note on Mt 19:18–19. This combination of the two commandments may already have been made in Judaism.
  10. 22:40 The double commandment is the source from which the whole law and the prophets are derived.
  11. 22:41–46 Having answered the questions of his opponents in the preceding three controversies, Jesus now puts a question to them about the sonship of the Messiah. Their easy response (Mt 22:43a) is countered by his quoting a verse of Ps 110 that raises a problem for their response (43b–45). They are unable to solve it and from that day on their questioning of him is ended.
  12. 22:41 The Pharisees…questioned them: Mark is not specific about who are questioned (Mk 12:35).
  13. 22:42–44 David’s: this view of the Pharisees was based on such Old Testament texts as Is 11:1–9; Jer 23:5; and Ez 34:23; see also the extrabiblical Psalms of Solomon 17:21. How, then…saying: Jesus cites Ps 110:1 accepting the Davidic authorship of the psalm, a common view of his time. The psalm was probably composed for the enthronement of a Davidic king of Judah. Matthew assumes that the Pharisees interpret it as referring to the Messiah, although there is no clear evidence that it was so interpreted in the Judaism of Jesus’ time. It was widely used in the early church as referring to the exaltation of the risen Jesus. My lord: understood as the Messiah.
  14. 22:45 Since Matthew presents Jesus both as Messiah (Mt 16:16) and as Son of David (Mt 1:1; see also note on Mt 9:27), the question is not meant to imply Jesus’ denial of Davidic sonship. It probably means that although he is the Son of David, he is someone greater, Son of Man and Son of God, and recognized as greater by David who calls him my ‘lord.’
New American Bible (Revised Edition) (NABRE)

Scripture texts, prefaces, introductions, footnotes and cross references used in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

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