A A A A A
Bible Book List

1 Chronicles 17 New English Translation (NET Bible)

God Makes a Promise to David

17 When David had settled into his palace,[a] he[b] said to Nathan the prophet, “Look, I am living in a palace[c] made from cedar, while the ark of the Lord’s covenant is under a tent.”[d] Nathan said to David, “You should do whatever you have in mind,[e] for God is with you.”

That night God told Nathan,[f] “Go, tell my servant David: ‘This is what the Lord says: “You must not build me a house in which to live. For I have not lived in a house from the time I brought Israel up from Egypt[g] to the present day. I have lived in a tent that has been in various places.[h] Wherever I moved throughout Israel, I did not say[i] to any of the leaders whom I appointed to care for my people Israel,[j] ‘Why have you not built me a house made from cedar?’”’

“So now, say this to my servant David: ‘This is what the Lord of Heaven’s Armies[k] says: “I took you from the pasture and from your work as a shepherd[l] to make you a leader of my people Israel. I was with you wherever you went and I defeated[m] all your enemies before you. Now I will make you as famous as the great men of the earth.[n] I will establish a place for my people Israel and settle[o] them there; they will live there and not be disturbed[p] anymore. Violent men will not oppress them again, as they did in the beginning[q] 10 and during the time when I appointed judges to lead my people Israel. I will subdue all your enemies.

“‘“I declare to you that the Lord will build a dynastic house[r] for you! 11 When the time comes for you to die,[s] I will raise up your descendant,[t] one of your own sons, to succeed you, and I will establish his kingdom. 12 He will build me a house, and I will make his dynasty permanent.[u] 13 I will become his father and he will become my son. I will never withhold my loyal love from him, as I withheld it from the one who ruled before you.[v] 14 I will put him in permanent charge of my house and my kingdom; his dynasty will be permanent.”’”[w] 15 Nathan told David all these words that were revealed to him.[x]

David Praises God

16 King David went in, sat before the Lord, and said: “Who am I, O Lord God, and what is my family,[y] that you should have brought me to this point? 17 And you did not stop there, O God! You have also spoken about the future of your servant’s family.[z] You have revealed to me what men long to know,[aa] O Lord God. 18 What more can David say[ab] to you? You have honored your servant; you have given your servant special recognition.[ac] 19 O Lord, for the sake of your servant and according to your will,[ad] you have done this great thing in order to reveal your greatness.[ae] 20 O Lord, there is none like you; there is no God besides you! What we heard is true![af] 21 And who is like your people, Israel, a unique nation[ag] in the earth? Their God[ah] went to claim[ai] a nation for himself! You made a name for yourself by doing great and awesome deeds[aj] when you drove out[ak] nations before your people whom you had delivered from the Egyptian empire and its gods.[al] 22 You made Israel your very own nation for all time.[am] You, O Lord, became their God. 23 So now, O Lord, may the promise you made about your servant and his family become a permanent reality![an] Do as you promised,[ao] 24 so[ap] it may become a reality[aq] and you may gain lasting fame,[ar] as people say,[as] ‘The Lord of Heaven’s Armies is the God of Israel.’[at] The dynasty[au] of your servant David will be established before you, 25 for you, my God, have revealed to your servant that you will build a dynasty[av] for him. That is why your servant has had the courage to pray to you.[aw] 26 Now, O Lord, you are the true God;[ax] you have made this good promise to your servant.[ay] 27 Now you are willing to bless your servant’s dynasty[az] so that it may stand permanently before you, for you, O Lord, have blessed it and it will be blessed from now on into the future.”[ba]

Footnotes:

  1. 1 Chronicles 17:1 tn Heb “house.”
  2. 1 Chronicles 17:1 tn Heb “David.” The pronoun “he” has been used in the translation here to avoid redundancy in keeping with contemporary English style.
  3. 1 Chronicles 17:1 tn Heb “house.”
  4. 1 Chronicles 17:1 tn Heb “tent curtains.”
  5. 1 Chronicles 17:2 tn Heb “all that is in your heart.”
  6. 1 Chronicles 17:3 tn Heb “the word of God was [i.e., came] to Nathan.”
  7. 1 Chronicles 17:5 tn The words “from Egypt” are supplied in the translation for clarification.
  8. 1 Chronicles 17:5 tc Heb “and I was from tent to tent and from tabernacle.” The words אֶל־מִשְׁכָּן (ʾel mishkan, “to tabernacle”) should probably be added at the end of the sentence to complete this prepositional phrase and produce symmetry with the preceding prepositional phrase. The words probably fell from the text by homoioteleuton.sn I have lived in a tent that has been in various places. The point here is that the Lord moved with the tabernacle as it moved from place to place; he did not confine himself to a particular location.
  9. 1 Chronicles 17:6 tn In the Hebrew text the statement is phrased as a rhetorical question (“Did I say a word?”) meaning “I did not say a word.”
  10. 1 Chronicles 17:6 tn Heb “to one of the judges of Israel whom I commanded to shepherd my people.”
  11. 1 Chronicles 17:7 tn Traditionally, “Lord of hosts.”
  12. 1 Chronicles 17:7 tn Heb “and from after sheep.”
  13. 1 Chronicles 17:8 tn Heb “cut off.”
  14. 1 Chronicles 17:8 tn Heb “and I will make for you a name like the name of the great men who are in the earth.”
  15. 1 Chronicles 17:9 tn Heb “plant.”
  16. 1 Chronicles 17:9 tn Heb “shaken.”
  17. 1 Chronicles 17:9 tn Heb “and sons of violence will no longer consume them as in the beginning.”
  18. 1 Chronicles 17:10 tn Here the word “house” is used in a metaphorical sense, referring to a royal dynasty. The Lord’s use of the word here plays off the literal sense that David had in mind as he contemplated building a temple (“house”) for the Lord. In the translation the adjective “dynastic” is supplied to indicate that the term is used metaphorically.
  19. 1 Chronicles 17:11 tn Heb “and it will be when your days are full to go with your ancestors.”
  20. 1 Chronicles 17:11 tn Heb “your seed.”
  21. 1 Chronicles 17:12 tn Heb “and I will establish his throne permanently.”
  22. 1 Chronicles 17:13 sn The one who ruled before you is a reference to Saul, from whom the kingdom was taken and given to David.
  23. 1 Chronicles 17:14 tn Heb “and his throne will be established permanently.”
  24. 1 Chronicles 17:15 tn Heb “according to all these words and according to all this revelation, so Nathan said to David.”
  25. 1 Chronicles 17:16 tn Heb “house.”
  26. 1 Chronicles 17:17 tn Heb “and this was small in your eyes, O God, so you spoke concerning the house of your servant for a distance.”
  27. 1 Chronicles 17:17 tn The translation “You have revealed to me what men long to know” is very tentative; the meaning of the Hebrew text is unclear. The text appears to read literally, “and you see me like the searching of man, that which is upward,” which is nonsensical. The translation above assumes the following: (1) The Qal verb translated “you see me” is repointed as a Hiphil, “you showed me,” (2) תּוֹר (tor) is understood in the sense of “searching, exploring,” and (3) הַמַּעֲלָה (hammaʿalah) is taken in a temporal sense of “that which lies beyond.” Thus one could translate, “you have shown me what men search for, what lies beyond.”
  28. 1 Chronicles 17:18 tn The word “say” is supplied in the translation for clarification. The Hebrew verb means “add.”
  29. 1 Chronicles 17:18 tn Heb “for honoring your servant, and you, your servant, know.”
  30. 1 Chronicles 17:19 tn Heb “heart.”
  31. 1 Chronicles 17:19 tn Heb “to make known all the great deeds.”
  32. 1 Chronicles 17:20 tn The Hebrew text reads literally, “in all which we heard with our ears,” but בְּכֹל (bekhol, “in all”) should probably be emended to כְּכֹל (kekhol, “according to all”).
  33. 1 Chronicles 17:21 tn Heb “a nation, one.”
  34. 1 Chronicles 17:21 tn Heb “whose God,” or “because God.” In the Hebrew text this clause is subordinated to what precedes. The clauses are separated in the translation for stylistic reasons.
  35. 1 Chronicles 17:21 tn Heb “redeem” or “deliver.”
  36. 1 Chronicles 17:21 tn Heb “to make for yourself a name [with] great and awesome [deeds].”
  37. 1 Chronicles 17:21 tn Heb “to drive out.”
  38. 1 Chronicles 17:21 tn Heb “from Egypt, nations.” The parallel text in 2 Sam 7:23 reads “from Egypt, nations and its gods.”
  39. 1 Chronicles 17:22 tn Heb “and you made your people Israel your own for a people permanently.”
  40. 1 Chronicles 17:23 tn Heb “and now, O Lord, the word which you spoke concerning your servant and concerning his house, may it be established permanently.”
  41. 1 Chronicles 17:23 tn Heb “as you have spoken.”
  42. 1 Chronicles 17:24 tn Following the imperative in v. 23b, the prefixed verbal form with vav (ו) conjunctive indicates purpose/result: “so it might become a reality.”
  43. 1 Chronicles 17:24 tn Heb “so it might be established.”
  44. 1 Chronicles 17:24 tn Heb “and your name might be great permanently.” Following the imperative in v. 23b, the prefixed verbal form with vav conjunctive indicates purpose/result (parallel to the previous purpose/result clause): “[so]…you might gain lasting fame.”
  45. 1 Chronicles 17:24 tn Heb “saying.” The words “as people” are supplied in the translation for clarification and for stylistic reasons.
  46. 1 Chronicles 17:24 tc Heb “the Lord of Heaven’s Armies [traditionally, the Lord of hosts], the God of Israel, Israel’s God.” The phrases אֱלֹהֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל (ʾelohey yisraʾel, “God of Israel”) and אֱלֹהִים לְיִשְׂרָאֵל (ʾelohim leyisraʾel, “Israel’s God”) are probably alternative readings that have been conflated in the text.
  47. 1 Chronicles 17:24 tn Heb “house.”
  48. 1 Chronicles 17:25 tn Heb “house.”
  49. 1 Chronicles 17:25 tn Heb “That is why your servant found to pray before you.” Perhaps the phrase אֶת לִבּוֹ (ʾet libbo, “his heart”) should be supplied as the object of the verb “found.”
  50. 1 Chronicles 17:26 tn Heb “the God.” The article indicates uniqueness here.
  51. 1 Chronicles 17:26 tn Heb “and you have spoken to your servant this good thing.”
  52. 1 Chronicles 17:27 tn Heb “house.”
  53. 1 Chronicles 17:27 tn Heb “for you, O Lord, have blessed and [it is] blessed permanently.”
New English Translation (NET)

NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2017 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://netbible.com All rights reserved.

Psalm 46 New English Translation (NET Bible)

Psalm 46[a]

For the music director, by the Korahites; according to the alamoth style;[b] a song.

46 God is our strong refuge;[c]
he is truly our helper in times of trouble.[d]
For this reason we do not fear[e] when the earth shakes,[f]
and the mountains tumble into the depths of the sea,[g]
when its waves[h] crash[i] and foam,
and the mountains shake[j] before the surging sea.[k] (Selah)
The river’s channels bring joy to the city of God,[l]
the special, holy dwelling place of[m] the Most High.[n]
God lives within it,[o] it cannot be moved.[p]
God rescues it[q] at the break of dawn.[r]
Nations are in uproar, kingdoms are overthrown.[s]
God[t] gives a shout,[u] the earth dissolves.[v]
The Lord of Heaven’s Armies is on our side.[w]
The God of Jacob[x] is our stronghold.[y] (Selah)
Come, Witness the exploits[z] of the Lord,
who brings devastation to the earth.[aa]
He brings an end to wars throughout the earth.[ab]
He shatters[ac] the bow and breaks[ad] the spear;
he burns[ae] the shields with fire.[af]
10 He says,[ag] “Stop your striving and recognize[ah] that I am God.
I will be exalted[ai] over[aj] the nations! I will be exalted over[ak] the earth!”
11 The Lord of Heaven’s Armies is on our side![al]
The God of Jacob[am] is our stronghold![an] (Selah)

Footnotes:

  1. Psalm 46:1 sn Psalm 46. In this so-called “Song Of Zion” God’s people confidently affirm that they are secure because the great warrior-king dwells within Jerusalem and protects it from the nations that cause such chaos in the earth. A refrain (vv. 7, 11) concludes the song’s two major sections.
  2. Psalm 46:1 sn The meaning of the Hebrew term עֲלָמוֹת (‘alamot, alamoth, which means “young women”) is uncertain; perhaps it refers to a particular style of music. Cf. 1 Chr 15:20.
  3. Psalm 46:1 tn Heb “our refuge and strength,” which is probably a hendiadys meaning “our strong refuge” (see Ps 71:7). Another option is to translate, “our refuge and source of strength.”
  4. Psalm 46:1 tn Heb “a helper in times of trouble he is found [to be] greatly.” The perfect verbal form has a generalizing function here. The adverb מְאֹד (meʾod, “greatly”) has an emphasizing function.
  5. Psalm 46:2 tn The imperfect is taken in a generalizing sense (cf. NEB) because the situation described in vv. 2-3 is understood as symbolizing typical world conditions. In this case the imperfect draws attention to the typical nature of the response. The covenant community characteristically responds with confidence, not fear. Another option is to take the situation described as purely hypothetical. In this case one might translate, “We will not fear, even though the earth should shake” (cf. NIV, NRSV).
  6. Psalm 46:2 tn The Hiphil infinitival form is normally taken to mean “when [the earth] is altered,” being derived from מוּר (mur, “to change”). In this case the Hiphil would be intransitive, as in Ps 15:4. HALOT 560 s.v. II מור emends the form to a Niphal and derives it from a homonymic root מוּר attested in Arabic with the meaning “shake.”
  7. Psalm 46:2 tn Heb “heart of the seas.” The plural may be used for emphasis, pointing to the deepest sea. Note that the next verse uses a singular pronoun (“its waters,” “its swelling”) in referring back to the plural noun.
  8. Psalm 46:3 tn Heb “its waters.”
  9. Psalm 46:3 tn Or “roar.”
  10. Psalm 46:3 tn The three imperfect verbal forms in v. 3 draw attention to the characteristic nature of the activity described.
  11. Psalm 46:3 tn Heb “at its swelling.” The Hebrew word often means “pride.” If the sea is symbolic of hostile nations, then this may be a case of double entendre. The surging, swelling sea symbolizes the proud, hostile nations. On the surface the psalmist appears to be depicting a major natural catastrophe, perhaps a tidal wave. If so, then the situation would be hypothetical. However, the repetition of the verbs הָמָה (hamah, “crash; roar,” v. 3) and מוֹט (mot, “shake,” v. 2) in v. 6, where nations/kingdoms “roar” and “shake,” suggests that the language of vv. 2-3 is symbolic and depicts the upheaval that characterizes relationships between the nations of the earth. As some nations (symbolized by the surging, chaotic waters) show hostility, others (symbolized by the mountains) come crashing down to destruction. The surging waters are symbolic of chaotic forces in other poetic texts (see, for example, Isa 17:12; Jer 51:42) and mountains can symbolize strong kingdoms (see, for example, Jer 51:25).
  12. Psalm 46:4 tn Heb “A river, its channels cause the city of God to be glad.”sn The city of God is Jerusalem (see Pss 48:1-2; 87:2-3). The river’s “channels” are probably irrigation ditches vital to growing crops. Some relate the imagery to the “waters of Shiloah” (see Isa 8:6), which flowed from the Gihon spring to the pool of Siloam. In Isa 8:6-8 these waters are contrasted with the flood waters symbolizing Assyria. Even if this is the reality behind the imagery, the picture of a river flowing through Jerusalem is idealized and exaggerated. The river and irrigation ditches symbolize the peace and prosperity that the Lord provides for Jerusalem, in contrast to the havoc produced by the turbulent waters (symbolic of the nations) outside the city. Some see here an adaptation of Canaanite (or, more specifically, Jebusite) mythical traditions of rivers/springs flowing from the high god El’s dwelling place. The Songs of Zion do utilize such imagery at times (see Ps 48:2). The image of a river flowing through Zion may have inspired prophetic visions of an eschatological river flowing from the temple (see Ezek 47:1-12; Joel 3:18).
  13. Psalm 46:4 tn Heb “the holy [place] of the dwelling places of.” The adjective “holy” is used here in a substantival manner and placed in construct with the following noun (see GKC 428 §132.c). Origen’s transliterated text assumes the reading קֹדֶשׁ (qodesh, “holiness; holy place”), while the LXX assumes a Piel verbal form קִדֵּשׁ (qiddesh, “makes holy”) and takes the following form as “his dwelling place.” The plural form מִשְׁכְּנֵי (mishkene, “dwelling places of”) is probably a plural of degree, emphasizing the special character of this dwelling place. See GKC 397 §124.b. The form stands as an appositional genitive in relation to the preceding construct noun.
  14. Psalm 46:4 sn The divine title “Most High” (עֶלְיוֹן, ʿelyon) pictures God as the exalted ruler of the universe who vindicates the innocent and judges the wicked. See especially Pss 7:17; 9:2; 18:13; 21:7; 47:2.
  15. Psalm 46:5 tn Heb “God [is] within her.” The feminine singular pronoun refers to the city mentioned in v. 4.
  16. Psalm 46:5 tn Another option is to translate the imperfect verbal form as future, “it will not be moved.” Even if one chooses this option, the future tense must be understood in a generalizing sense. The verb מוֹט (mot) is used in v. 2 of the mountains “tumbling” into the seas and in v. 6 of nations being “overthrown.” By way of contrast, Jerusalem, God’s dwelling place, is secure and immune from such turmoil and destruction.
  17. Psalm 46:5 tn Or “helps her.” The imperfect draws attention to the generalizing character of the statement.
  18. Psalm 46:5 tn Heb “at the turning of morning.” (For other uses of the expression see Exod 14:27 and Judg 19:26).sn At the break of dawn. The “morning” is viewed metaphorically as a time of deliverance and vindication after the dark “night” of trouble (see Ps 30:5; Isa 17:14). There may be an allusion here to Exod 14:27 (where the Lord destroyed the Egyptians at the “break of dawn”) or, more likely, to the miraculous deliverance of Jerusalem from the Assyrian siege, when the people discovered the dead bodies of the Assyrian army in the morning (Isa 37:36).
  19. Psalm 46:6 tn Heb “nations roar, kingdoms shake.” The Hebrew verb הָמָה (hamah, “roar, be in uproar”) is used in v. 3 of the waves crashing, while the verb מוֹט (mot, “overthrown”) is used in v. 2 of mountains tumbling into the sea (see also v. 5, where the psalm affirms that Jerusalem “cannot be moved”). The repetition of the verbs suggests that the language of vv. 2-3 is symbolic and depicts the upheaval that characterizes relationships between the nations of the earth. As some nations (symbolized by the surging, chaotic waters) show hostility, others (symbolized by the mountains) come crashing down to destruction. The surging waters are symbolic of chaotic forces in other poetic texts (see, for example, Isa 17:12; Jer 51:42) and mountains can symbolize strong kingdoms (see, for example, Jer 51:25).
  20. Psalm 46:6 tn Heb “He.” God is the obvious referent here (see v. 5), and has been specified in the translation for clarity.
  21. Psalm 46:6 tn Heb “offers his voice.” In theophanic texts the phrase refers to God’s thunderous shout which functions as a battle cry (see Pss 18:13; 68:33).
  22. Psalm 46:6 tn Or “melts.” See Amos 9:5. The image depicts the nation’s helplessness before Jerusalem’s defender, who annihilates their armies (see vv. 8-9). The imperfect verbal form emphasizes the characteristic nature of the action described.
  23. Psalm 46:7 tn Heb “the Lord of hosts is with us.” The title “Lord of hosts” here pictures the Lord as a mighty warrior-king who leads armies into battle (see Ps 24:10). The military imagery is further developed in vv. 8-9.
  24. Psalm 46:7 tn That is, Israel, or Judah (see Ps 20:1).
  25. Psalm 46:7 tn Heb “our elevated place” (see Pss 9:9; 18:2).
  26. Psalm 46:8 sn In this context the Lord’s exploits are military in nature (see vv. 8b-9).
  27. Psalm 46:8 tn Heb “who sets desolations in the earth” (see Isa 13:9). The active participle describes God’s characteristic activity as a warrior.
  28. Psalm 46:9 tn Heb “[the] one who causes wars to cease unto the end of the earth.” The participle continues the description begun in v. 8b and indicates that this is the Lord’s characteristic activity. Ironically, he brings peace to the earth by devastating the warlike, hostile nations (vv. 8, 9b).
  29. Psalm 46:9 tn The verb שָׁבַר (shavar, “break”) appears in the Piel here (see Ps 29:5). In the OT it occurs thirty-six times in the Piel, always with multiple objects (the object is either a collective singular or grammatically plural or dual form). The Piel may highlight the repetition of the pluralative action, or it may suggest an intensification of action, indicating repeated action comprising a whole, perhaps with the nuance “break again and again, break in pieces.” Another option is to understand the form as resultative: “make broken” (see IBHS 404-7 §24.3). The imperfect verbal form carries on and emphasizes the generalizing nature of the description.
  30. Psalm 46:9 tn The perfect verbal form with vav (ו) consecutive carries along the generalizing emphasis of the preceding imperfect.
  31. Psalm 46:9 tn The imperfect verbal form carries on and emphasizes the generalizing nature of the description.
  32. Psalm 46:9 tn Heb “wagons he burns with fire.” Some read “chariots” here (cf. NASB), but the Hebrew word refers to wagons or carts, not chariots, elsewhere in the OT. In this context, where military weapons are mentioned, it is better to revocalize the form as עֲגִלוֹת (ʿagilot, “round shields”), a word which occurs only here in the OT, but is attested in later Hebrew and Aramaic.
  33. Psalm 46:10 tn The words “he says” are supplied in the translation for clarification.
  34. Psalm 46:10 tn Heb “do nothing/be quiet (see 1 Sam 15:16) and know.” This statement may be addressed to the hostile nations, indicating they should cease their efforts to destroy God’s people, or to Judah, indicating they should rest secure in God’s protection. Since the psalm is an expression of Judah’s trust and confidence, it is more likely that the words are directed to the nations, who are actively promoting chaos and are in need of a rebuke.
  35. Psalm 46:10 tn Elsewhere in the psalms the verb רוּם (rum, “be exalted”) when used of God, refers to his exalted position as king (Pss 18:46; 99:2; 113:4; 138:6) and/or his self-revelation as king through his mighty deeds of deliverance (Pss 21:13; 57:5, 11).
  36. Psalm 46:10 tn Or “among.”
  37. Psalm 46:10 tn Or “in.”
  38. Psalm 46:11 tn Heb “the Lord of hosts is with us.” The title “Lord of hosts” here pictures the Lord as a mighty warrior-king who leads armies into battle (see Ps 24:10). The military imagery is further developed in vv. 8-9.
  39. Psalm 46:11 tn That is, Israel, or Judah (see Ps 20:1).
  40. Psalm 46:11 tn Heb “our elevated place” (see Pss 9:9; 18:2).
New English Translation (NET)

NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2017 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://netbible.com All rights reserved.

Mark 14:1-31 New English Translation (NET Bible)

The Plot Against Jesus

14 Two days before the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread, the chief priests and the experts in the law[a] were trying to find a way[b] to arrest Jesus[c] by stealth and kill him. For they said, “Not during the feast, so there won’t be a riot among the people.”[d]

Jesus’ Anointing

Now[e] while Jesus[f] was in Bethany at the house of Simon the leper,[g] reclining at the table,[h] a woman came with an alabaster jar[i] of costly aromatic oil[j] from pure nard. After breaking open the jar, she poured it on his head. But some who were present indignantly said to one another, “Why this waste of expensive[k] ointment? It[l] could have been sold for more than 300 silver coins[m] and the money[n] given to the poor!” So[o] they spoke angrily to her. But Jesus said, “Leave her alone. Why are you bothering her? She has done a good service for me. For you will always have the poor with you, and you can do good for them whenever you want. But you will not always have me![p] She did what she could. She anointed my body beforehand for burial. I tell you the truth,[q] wherever the gospel is proclaimed in the whole world, what she has done will also be told in memory of her.”

The Plan to Betray Jesus

10 Then[r] Judas Iscariot, one of the twelve, went to the chief priests to betray Jesus into their hands.[s] 11 When they heard this, they were delighted[t] and promised to give him money.[u] So[v] Judas[w] began looking for an opportunity to betray him.

The Passover

12 Now[x] on the first day of the feast of[y] Unleavened Bread, when the Passover lamb is sacrificed,[z] Jesus’[aa] disciples said to him, “Where do you want us to prepare for you to eat the Passover?”[ab] 13 He sent two of his disciples and told them, “Go into the city, and a man carrying a jar[ac] of water will meet you. Follow him. 14 Wherever he enters, tell the owner of the house, ‘The Teacher says, “Where is my guest room where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?”’ 15 He will show you a large room upstairs, furnished and ready. Make preparations for us there.” 16 So[ad] the disciples left, went[ae] into the city, and found things just as he had told them,[af] and they prepared the Passover.

17 Then,[ag] when it was evening, he came to the house[ah] with the twelve. 18 While they were at the table[ai] eating, Jesus said, “I tell you the truth,[aj] one of you eating with me will betray me.”[ak] 19 They were distressed, and one by one said to him, “Surely not I?” 20 He said to them, “It is one of the twelve, one who dips his hand[al] with me into the bowl.[am] 21 For the Son of Man will go as it is written about him, but woe to that man by whom the Son of Man is betrayed! It would be better for him if he had never been born.”

The Lord’s Supper

22 While they were eating, he took bread, and after giving thanks he broke it, gave it to them, and said, “Take it. This is my body.” 23 And after taking the cup and giving thanks, he gave it to them, and they all drank from it. 24 He said to them, “This is my blood, the blood[an] of the covenant,[ao] that is poured out for many. 25 I tell you the truth,[ap] I will no longer drink of the fruit[aq] of the vine until that day when I drink it new in the kingdom of God.”[ar] 26 After singing a hymn,[as] they went out to the Mount of Olives.

The Prediction of Peter’s Denial

27 Then[at] Jesus said to them, “You will all fall away, for it is written,

I will strike the shepherd,
and the sheep will be scattered.’[au]

28 But after I am raised, I will go ahead of you into Galilee.” 29 Peter said to him, “Even if they all fall away, I will not!” 30 Jesus said to him, “I tell you the truth,[av] today—this very night—before a rooster crows twice, you will deny me three times.” 31 But Peter[aw] insisted emphatically,[ax] “Even if I must die with you, I will never deny you.” And all of them said the same thing.

Footnotes:

  1. Mark 14:1 tn Or “the chief priests and the scribes.” See the note on the phrase “experts in the law” in 1:22.
  2. Mark 14:1 tn Grk “were seeking how.”
  3. Mark 14:1 tn Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.
  4. Mark 14:2 sn The suggestion here is that Jesus was too popular to openly arrest him. The verb were trying is imperfect. It suggests, in this context, that they were always considering the opportunities.
  5. Mark 14:3 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.
  6. Mark 14:3 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.
  7. Mark 14:3 sn See the note on leper in Mark 1:40.
  8. Mark 14:3 sn 1st century middle eastern meals were not eaten while sitting at a table, but while reclining on one’s side on the floor with the head closest to the low table and the feet farthest away.
  9. Mark 14:3 sn A jar made of alabaster stone was normally used for very precious substances like perfumes. It normally had a long neck which was sealed and had to be broken off so the contents could be used.
  10. Mark 14:3 tn Μύρον (muron) was usually made of myrrh (from which the English word is derived) but here it is used in the sense of ointment or perfumed oil (L&N 6.205). The adjective πιστικῆς (pistikēs) is difficult with regard to its exact meaning; some have taken it to derive from πίστις (pistis) and relate to the purity of the oil of nard. More probably it is something like a brand name, “pistic nard,” the exact significance of which has not been discovered.sn Nard or spikenard is a fragrant oil from the root and spike of the nard plant of northern India. This aromatic oil, if made of something like nard, would have been extremely expensive, costing up to a year’s pay for an average laborer.
  11. Mark 14:4 tn The word “expensive” is not in the Greek text but has been included to suggest a connection to the lengthy phrase “costly aromatic oil from pure nard” occurring earlier in v. 3. The author of Mark shortened this long phrase to just one word in Greek when repeated here, and the phrase “expensive ointment” used in the translation is intended as an abbreviated paraphrase.
  12. Mark 14:5 tn Here γάρ (gar) has not been translated.
  13. Mark 14:5 tn Grk “three hundred denarii.” One denarius was the standard day’s wage, so the value exceeded what a laborer could earn in a year (taking in to account Sabbaths and feast days when no work was done).
  14. Mark 14:5 tn The words “the money” are not in the Greek text, but are implied (as the proceeds from the sale of the perfumed oil).
  15. Mark 14:5 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of previous action(s) in the narrative.
  16. Mark 14:7 tn In the Greek text of this clause, “me” is in emphatic position (the first word in the clause). To convey some impression of the emphasis, an exclamation point is used in the translation.
  17. Mark 14:9 tn Grk “Truly (ἀμήν, amēn), I say to you.”
  18. Mark 14:10 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.
  19. Mark 14:10 tn Grk “betray him to them”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.
  20. Mark 14:11 sn The leaders were delighted when Judas contacted them about betraying Jesus, because it gave them the opportunity they had been looking for, and they could later claim that Jesus had been betrayed by one of his own disciples.
  21. Mark 14:11 sn Matt 26:15 states the amount of money they gave Judas was thirty pieces of silver (see also Matt 27:3-4; Zech 11:12-13).
  22. Mark 14:11 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of previous action(s) in the narrative.
  23. Mark 14:11 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Judas) has been specified in the translation for clarity.
  24. Mark 14:12 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.
  25. Mark 14:12 tn The words “the feast of” are not in the Greek text, but have been supplied for clarity.
  26. Mark 14:12 sn Generally the feast of Unleavened Bread would refer to Nisan 15 (Friday), but the following reference to the sacrifice of the Passover lamb indicates that Nisan 14 (Thursday) was what Mark had in mind (Nisan = March 27 to April 25). The celebration of the Feast of Unleavened Bread lasted eight days, beginning with the Passover meal. The celebrations were so close together that at times the names of both were used interchangeably.
  27. Mark 14:12 tn Grk “his”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.
  28. Mark 14:12 sn This required getting a suitable lamb and finding lodging in Jerusalem where the meal could be eaten. The population of the city swelled during the feast, so lodging could be difficult to find. The Passover was celebrated each year in commemoration of the Israelites’ deliverance from Egypt; thus it was a feast celebrating redemption (see Exod 12). The Passover lamb was roasted and eaten after sunset in a family group of at least ten people (m. Pesahim 7.13). People ate the meal while reclining (see the note on table in 14:18). It included, besides the lamb, unleavened bread and bitter herbs as a reminder of Israel’s bitter affliction at the hands of the Egyptians. Four cups of wine mixed with water were also used for the meal. For a further description of the meal and the significance of the wine cups, see E. Ferguson, Backgrounds of Early Christianity, 523-24.
  29. Mark 14:13 sn Since women usually carried these jars, it would have been no problem for the two disciples (Luke 22:8 states that they were Peter and John) to recognize the man Jesus was referring to.
  30. Mark 14:16 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the flow within the narrative.
  31. Mark 14:16 tn Grk “and came.”
  32. Mark 14:16 sn The author’s note that the disciples found things just as he had told them shows that Jesus’ word could be trusted.
  33. Mark 14:17 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.
  34. Mark 14:17 tn The prepositional phrase “to the house” is not in the Greek text, but has been supplied for clarity.
  35. Mark 14:18 tn Grk “while they were reclined at the table.”sn 1st century middle eastern meals were not eaten while sitting at a table, but while reclining on one’s side on the floor with the head closest to the low table and the feet farthest away.
  36. Mark 14:18 tn Grk “Truly (ἀμήν, amēn), I say to you.”
  37. Mark 14:18 tn Or “will hand me over”; Grk “one of you will betray me, the one who eats with me.”
  38. Mark 14:20 tn Grk “one who dips with me.” The phrase “his hand” has been supplied in the translation for clarity.
  39. Mark 14:20 sn One who dips with me in the bowl. The point of Jesus’ comment here is not to identify the specific individual per se, but to indicate that it is one who was close to him—somebody whom no one would suspect. His comment serves to heighten the treachery of Judas’ betrayal.
  40. Mark 14:24 tn Grk “this is my blood of the covenant that is poured out for many.” In order to avoid confusion about which is poured out, the translation supplies “blood” twice so that the following phrase clearly modifies “blood,” not “covenant.”
  41. Mark 14:24 tc Most mss (A ƒ1,13 M lat sy) have καινῆς (kainēs, “new”) before διαθήκης (diathēkēs, “covenant”), a reading that is almost surely influenced by the parallel passage in Luke 22:20. Further, the construction τὸ τῆς καινῆς διαθήκης (to tēs kainēs diathēkēs), in which the resumptive article τό (referring back to τὸ αἷμα [to |aima, “the blood”]) is immediately followed by the genitive article, is nowhere else used in Mark except for constructions involving a genitive of relationship (cf. Mark 2:14; 3:17, 18; 16:1). Thus, on both transcriptional and intrinsic grounds, this reading looks to be a later addition (which may have derived from τὸ τῆς διαθήκης of D* W). The most reliable mss, along with several others (א B C Dc L Θ Ψ 565), lack καινῆς. This reading is strongly preferred.sn Jesus’ death established the forgiveness promised in the new covenant of Jer 31:31. Jesus is reinterpreting the symbolism of the Passover meal, indicating the presence of a new era.
  42. Mark 14:25 tn Grk “Truly (ἀμήν, amēn), I say to you.”
  43. Mark 14:25 tn Grk “the produce” (“the produce of the vine” is a figurative expression for wine).
  44. Mark 14:25 sn The kingdom of God is a major theme of Jesus’ teaching. The nature of the kingdom of God in the NT and in Jesus’ teaching has long been debated by interpreters and scholars, with discussion primarily centering around the nature of the kingdom (earthly, heavenly, or both) and the kingdom’s arrival (present, future, or both). An additional major issue concerns the relationship between the kingdom of God and the person and work of Jesus himself.
  45. Mark 14:26 sn After singing a hymn. The Hallel Psalms (Pss 113-118) were sung during the meal. Psalms 113 and 114 were sung just before the second cup and 115-118 were sung at the end of the meal, after the fourth, or hallel cup.
  46. Mark 14:27 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.
  47. Mark 14:27 sn A quotation from Zech 13:7.
  48. Mark 14:30 tn Grk “Truly (ἀμήν, amēn), I say to you.”
  49. Mark 14:31 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Peter) has been specified in the translation for clarity.
  50. Mark 14:31 tn Grk “said emphatically.”
New English Translation (NET)

NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2017 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://netbible.com All rights reserved.

  Back

1 of 1

You'll get this book and many others when you join Bible Gateway Plus. Learn more

Viewing of
Cross references
Footnotes