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Another and a nobler exhibition

‘To the intent that now unto the principalities and powers in heavenly places might be known by the church the manifold wisdom of God.’ Ephesians 3:10

Suggested Further Reading: Revelation 7:9–12

Let the angel speak awhile for himself. ‘Here,’ says he, ‘I see men of all nations, and kindreds, and tongues, from Britain to Japan, from the frozen north to the burning zone beneath the equator; here I see souls of all ages, babes hither snatched from the womb and breast, and spirits that once knew palsied age to whom the grasshopper was a burden. Here I see men from all periods, from Adam and Abel down to the men who were alive and remained at the coming of the Son of God from heaven. Here I see them of all classes. There is one who was a king, and another that tugged the oar as a galley-slave. There I see a merchant prince who counted not his riches dear unto him, and by his side a poor man who was rich in faith and heir of the kingdom. Here I see Magdalene and Saul of Tarsus, repenting sinners of all shades and saints of all varieties, those who showed their patience on a lingering sick bed, those who triumphed with holy boldness amid the red flames, those who wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins, destitute, afflicted, tormented, of whom the world was not worthy; the monk who shook the world, and he who cast salt into the stream of doctrine and made it wholesome and pure; the man who preached to his millions, and brought tens of thousands of souls to Christ, and the humble cottager who knew but this Bible true—here they all are.’

For meditation: God alone knows how many Christ has redeemed from every kindred, tongue, people and nation (Revelation 5:9; 7:9–10). Do you want to be in that number? Have you responded to the gospel proclaimed worldwide (Revelation 14:6–7)?

N.B. This sermon followed the opening in London of the 2nd Great International Exhibition on 1 May 1862.

Sermon no. 448
4 May (1862)

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