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The great arbitration case

‘Neither is there any daysman betwixt us, that might lay his hand upon us both.’ Job 9:33

Suggested Further Reading: 1 Timothy 2:1–6

We have all been thinking lately about the Atlantic cable. It is a very interesting attempt to join two worlds together. That cable has had to be sunk into the depths of the sea, in the hope of establishing a union between the two worlds, and now we are disappointed again. But what an infinitely greater wonder has been accomplished. Christ Jesus sank down deep into the woes of man till all God’s waves and billows had gone over him, that he might become the great telegraphic communication between God and poor sinners. Let me say to you, sinner, that there was no failure in the laying down of that blessed cable. It went down deep; the end was well secured, and it went into the depths of our sin and woe; and on the other side it has gone right up to the eternal throne, and is fastened there by God himself. You may work that telegraph today, and you may easily understand the art of working it too. A sigh or a tear will work it. Say, ‘God be merciful to me a sinner,’ and along the wire the message will flash, and will reach God before it comes from you. It is swifter far than earthly telegraphs; and there will come an answer back much sooner than you ever dream of, for it is promised—‘Before they call I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear.’ Who ever heard of such a communication as this between man and man? But it really does exist between sinners and God, since Christ has opened up a way from the depths of our sin to the heights of his glory.

For meditation: Unlike the Atlantic cable, the way between God and man has needed establishing once only (Romans 6:10; Hebrews 7:25,27; 9:12,26,28; 10:10; 1 Peter 3:18); he has worked perfectly well ever since for all who come to God by him and will never need repairing.

N.B. A telegraph cable across the Atlantic was first established, after three failures, in 1866. This undated sermon appeared in November 1865.

Sermon no. 661
2 May (Undated Sermon)

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