Verses 173–174

Here, 1. David prays that divine grace would work for him: Let thy hand help me. He finds his own hands are not sufficient for him, nor can any creature lend him a helping hand to any purpose; therefore he looks up to God in hopes that the hand that had made him would help him; for, if the Lord do not help us, whence can any creature help us? All our help must be expected from God’s hand, from his power and his bounty. 2. He pleads what divine grace had already wrought in him as a pledge of further mercy, being a qualification for it. Three things he pleads:—(1.) That he had made religion his serious and deliberate choice: “I have chosen thy precepts. I took them for my rule, not because I knew no other, but because, upon trial, I knew no better.” Those are good, and do good indeed, who are good and do good, not by chance, but from choice; and those who have thus chosen God’s precepts may depend upon God’ 15df s helping hand in all their services and under all their sufferings. (2.) That his heart was upon heaven: I have longed for thy salvation. David, when he had got to the throne, met with enough in the world to court his stay, and to make him say, “It is good to be here;” but still he was looking further, and longing for something better in another world. There is an eternal salvation which all the saints are longing for, and therefore pray that God’s hand would help them forward in their way to it. (3.) That he took pleasure in doing his duty: “Thy law is my delight. Not only I delight in it, but it is my delight, the greatest delight I have in this world.” Those that are cheerful in their obedience may in faith beg help of God to carry them on in their obedience; and those that expect God’s salvation must take delight in his law and their hopes must increase their delight.