Verse 22

See here, 1. Of what ill consequence it is to be precipitate and rash, and to act without advice: Men’s purposes are disappointed, their measures broken, and they come short of their point, gain not their end, because they would not ask counsel about the way. If men will not take time and pains to deliberate with themselves, or are so confident of their own judgment that they scorn to consult with others, they are not likely to bring any thing considerable to pass; circumstances defeat them which, with a little consultation, might have been foreseen and obviated. It is a good rule, both in public and domestic affairs, to do nothing rashly and of one’s own head. Plus vident oculi quam oculus—Many eyes see more than one. That often proves best which was least our own doing. 2. How much it will be for our advantage to ask the advice of our friends: In the multitude of counsellors (provided they be discreet and honest, and will not give counsel with a spirit of contradiction) purposes are established. Solomon’s son made no good use of this proverb when he acquiesced not in the counsel of the old men, but because he would have a multitud 3c79 e of counsellors, regarding number more than weight, advised with the young men.